Shortening carbon bars

Peaky Rider

E*POWAH Master
Feb 9, 2019
837
531
Derbyshire Dales
The standard carbon bars on my Rail are a bit too wide and are giving wrist ache.
I'd like to take a couple of centimetres off them, maybe a bit more, as I have with my other bikes but I am sure I have read somewhere that this is not straight forward with carbon ones.
Anyone any advice for me
 

Bndit

Active member
Jul 14, 2022
166
207
Finland
If you saw it yourself, use water so that you don`t breath carbon dust, it`s not good for your health…
 

Peaky Rider

E*POWAH Master
Feb 9, 2019
837
531
Derbyshire Dales
Thanks, I'll bare that in mind, but my real question is, how do I actually cut them?
Can I use a hack saw or is some sort of pipe cutter necessary? Or is there another method?
 

Zimmerframe

MUPPET
Subscriber
Jun 12, 2019
13,889
20,581
Brittany, France
Thanks, I'll bare that in mind, but my real question is, how do I actually cut them?
Can I use a hack saw or is some sort of pipe cutter necessary? Or is there another method?
I just used an angle grinder with a really thin cutting disk. If that's "The best" method, I have no idea, but it took about 8 seconds and left a nice clean cut.
 

Plummet

Flash Git
Mar 16, 2023
1,045
1,485
New Zealand
I would advice against and angle grinder with a cutting disc. Too easy to cut off line.

Measure 3 times, mark it out, tape the next to your mark on part of the bar you aren't cutting off. Slowly hacksaw the end of with a fine blade using the Tape as a guide to cut square. Then find some 120 grit sand paper and sand the ends smooth.

If there are daggy bits you can use super glue to seal/clean up the ends.
 

Peaky Rider

E*POWAH Master
Feb 9, 2019
837
531
Derbyshire Dales
Thanks Zimmer and Plummet, I don't trust myself with an angle grinder, did wonder about a Dremel but probably not up to the job.
Hacksaw it is then now that no one has said "don't go near them with a hacksaw". first need to make some sort of guide to keep the cut square and not forget about the dust issue.
 

RustyIron

E*POWAH Elite World Champion
Subscriber
Jun 5, 2021
1,588
2,482
La Habra, California
You can cut the bars with a hacksaw. Use the finest tooth pitch that you have. Wrap some masking tape around the bars with your intended cut in the middle. It will reduce the chipping at the very edge. Finish it up with a medium-fine file. You can use your Dremel, but it will just take a little longer. Don't use a pipe cutter.
 

Darren66

Member
Mar 7, 2020
121
86
uk
Or this, £16 from Amazon

Screenshot_20240609_173405_Amazon Shopping.jpg
 

Peaky Rider

E*POWAH Master
Feb 9, 2019
837
531
Derbyshire Dales
Might have looked into that save for the fact I've done the job with the aid of two jubilee clips, side by side, with a blade width gap between to guide the saw.
Either the new blade I put in the junior hacksaw was rubbish or cf bars are really tough.
 

steve_sordy

Wedding Crasher
Nov 5, 2018
8,575
8,841
Lincolnshire, UK
@Peaky Rider Helpful post! :)

My concern is the relatively inflexible nature of jubilee clips. I have not bought any recently, but all the ones I know about are metal. They have to be wound up fairly tight to not slip and the non-round shape they create may put too much crush stress on the bars. You obviously succeeded, so my concerns may be unwarranted. As soon as I thought of your idea, my mind went straight to zip ties. They are only needed as a guide, so metal is not required. Great idea though, better than masking tape and a pencil mark! :)
 

Peaky Rider

E*POWAH Master
Feb 9, 2019
837
531
Derbyshire Dales
I just coated the bars in masking tape first to avoid slippage and damage. Used a vice and pliers to get theclips as 'round' as possible. Did not over tighten, just firmly enough for them to stay in place. Sawed away, carefully, with front wheel held in a Workmate on its side. Job done.
I can't imagine zip ties would be tough enough to keep the blade under control.
 

Plummet

Flash Git
Mar 16, 2023
1,045
1,485
New Zealand
Thanks Zimmer and Plummet, I don't trust myself with an angle grinder, did wonder about a Dremel but probably not up to the job.
Hacksaw it is then now that no one has said "don't go near them with a hacksaw". first need to make some sort of guide to keep the cut square and not forget about the dust issue.
Inhaling dust is more of a high speed cutting/sanding tool issue. Slow speed hacksaw and then manual sandpaper will be fine. Just tidy up immediately once done and try not to get the dust on your hands/skin. It can be itchy AF.

Remember you cant make them l wider again once cut. If in doubt cut off less, test then cut off more later if need be.
 

steve_sordy

Wedding Crasher
Nov 5, 2018
8,575
8,841
Lincolnshire, UK
I read somewhere that if you don't know for certain how short to cut them, then just move the grips inwards along with any other bar furniture and ride the bike like that. You will soon find out where the best place is. Then you can cut. :)
 

TheSnowShark

Member
Subscriber
Sep 7, 2023
185
238
French-Alpes
Having been doing model making for over 50 years I have cut a bunch of carbon plates and tubes, as long as you do it by hand it hardly raises any dust that you could inhale.

And the good idea is to wrap the tube with masking tape and cut it quietly with a hacksaw, but to do it well you have to turn the tube while cutting, to always saw towards the inside of this one

🍻
 

Stihldog

Handheld Power Tool
Subscriber
Jun 10, 2020
3,060
4,270
Coquitlam, BC
Thanks everyone. Job done and all is well.
Awesome 👏.
If you cut the bar too short just use a bar stretcher …it looks like a board stretcher …but it’s for eMTB carbon bars.😉 (no link for that tool …just ask your local hardware store)👍🏻

And for the sake of all humanity …don’t use a pipe cutter. 😱
 

Stihldog

Handheld Power Tool
Subscriber
Jun 10, 2020
3,060
4,270
Coquitlam, BC
Use a tube cutter, cut is straight and no dust. View attachment 142205
IMO that’s the wrong tool for this job. If the circular cutting disc is not extremely sharp too much pressure needs to be applied to the end of the bar for a clean cut.

It won’t make any dust …but you could accidentally crush the bar end. Carbon cracks are difficult to see or detect.

On a carbon arrow the shaft had to be flexed before each shot. If you hear a creak or squeak while flexing the shaft …it’s garbage, toast, dangerous etc.
 

TurboJoe

Member
Jul 11, 2020
19
10
San Jose, CA
IMO that’s the wrong tool for this job. If the circular cutting disc is not extremely sharp too much pressure needs to be applied to the end of the bar for a clean cut.

It won’t make any dust …but you could accidentally crush the bar end. Carbon cracks are difficult to see or detect.

On a carbon arrow the shaft had to be flexed before each shot. If you hear a creak or squeak while flexing the shaft …it’s garbage, toast, dangerous etc.
All I can say it works for me, many times.
 

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