Motor reliabilty

DMO58

Member
Aug 28, 2019
9
5
Sussex
Why is there no publicly available data on motor reliability by brand and model ?

This may seem a bit of a rant but it is based on true experience

Manufacturers seem to build a wall of silence and I have found no data to support any buyer of an EMTB in selecting the best motor (reliability) which is a key part of a very expensive purchase. We are paying nearly as much for EMTBs as a small family car yet have to take on trust that the motor will be reliable for the life of the bike. Who would buy a new car without reliable information on dealer and manufacturer support to maintain and service the most costly component i.e. the engine / motor ? At least on a car you can service the engine and rely upon the electrics being fit to use in all weathers and conditions !

I may be jaundiced by the fact that I have had 4 total motor failures on 2 bikes in 5 years - 3 Shimano E8000 and 1 Shimano EP8 but surely I can't just be unlucky!! The concept of Shimano Service Centres is wholly flawed as they are not able to service anything, just charge you for the benefit of diagnosing something (which should be available via their App ) and then charging to remove the motor and return it to Shimano. And that is when it is within the warranty period ! I am certainly looking to avoid Shimano on any future EMTB but how can I avoid similar problems when selecting an alternative motor ?

I take great care of all of the electrics but it seems that there is not even basic IP66 protection from water and dust ingress ( hurrah for Specilaized for their IP56 certifed SL motors but where is the rest of the industry?)

Ebikes are deisgned to be ridden in all varieties of dry , wet, dusty and muddy conditions but it seems most motors are not fit for purpose leaving the internal electronics very vulnerable to ingress of dust and dampness.

Unfortunately bike reviewers are also culpable in their obsession with relative power and feel without any guidance on proven relaiobility and support.

My (very costly and frustrating) experience has negatively tainted my enthusiasm for all things EMTB as it is a wonderful sport - until the motor goes wrong. So let's get some proper information to support consumers and also push for proper long term warranties from motor manufacturers and/or the bike manufacturers.
 

Mikerb

E*POWAH Elite World Champion
May 16, 2019
6,080
4,603
Weymouth
Possibly because there is such a wide variability of use? Pedelecs primarilly used only on paved surfaces as city/commuter bikes probably have a much easier life than EMTBs even with significantly higher mileage. Keep in mind the electric motor set ups we use have had little more than a decade of development whereas the automotive industry has continuously developed the internal combustion engine for over 150 years and sold millions of cars equipped with them virtually every year for the last 50 years.
There may not be industry wide data on motor reliability but at least this forum provides some indications from purely a EMTB user base.
I would judge from comments I read, that the Bosch Performance CX is probably the most reliable motor, probably more time required to see if the past record of Brose failures is now fixed, but at least it has undergone developments to address known issues. Much less feedback on Yamaha so who knows! The newer low powered motors have probably not been in use long enough to judge. No point commenting on Shimano since you have probably made your mind up on that one!!
 
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calnearlyebike

New Member
Feb 8, 2024
4
3
warrington
id love an ebike. its just this sort of topic that puts me off. how can they be that unreliable yet sell so many ? is it a case of the disappointed users making the loudest noise ? or is it really that bad ?
 

arTNC

New Member
Feb 1, 2024
70
119
Texas
We sell Trek, Specialized, and Santa Cruz at the shop I work part time at. We haven't seen enough SC bikes with the Shimano motor at this time to be fair to them one way or another. On the Brose motors in the Spec bikes, they seem to have shown the most problems as far as frequency. The bulk of them seem to work well, but so far they've led the pack in problems. The Bosch motor in the Treks have been relatively bulletproof.

This is one shop with one set of circumstances, so take that for whatever it's worth.
 

Husky430

E*POWAH Master
Jul 8, 2019
570
945
Glasshouse Mts - Australia
Shit-moano motors leave a lot to be desired as I have had one fail completely and then the replacement motor played up too.
Would not buy another Shimano powered bike ever.
My current bike has a Bosch CX motor and in the nearly 3000km I've done on it so far has not even thrown an error code or failed to start, something which seems to be a regular occurence with the Shimano motors.
Saying that the wife's bike has a Shimano motor (bike purchased before I had serious trouble with my bike) and although it throws error codes, plus sometimes on start up the screen doesn't light up requiring you to turn it off and start again, it's still going strong after 2000+km.
These expensive toys should last for 10s of thousands of km though if you think about their cost say compared with a off road motor bike which has to deal with similar conditions.
Hopefully I haven't jinxed myself as I'm loving the Bosch motor, more grunt and less hassle than Shit-moano by far.
You can get a lemon in anything but the Bosch seems to be the pick of the bunch by far, jump in and get something with a Bosch motor and hopefully you'll have a great run like many on here.
 
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lovespicyfood

New Member
Nov 24, 2023
38
10
California
I stressed so much on this before buying my first e-bike. I was set on a Bosch motor and even test rode a Bosch equipped bike. When I asked the bike mechanic what was most reliable in their shop, despite me testing a Bosch equipped bike, I was surprised he told me they see the least amount of issues from Shimano.

I didn't end up buying that Bosch bike but got a Canyon w/ the EP801. Knock on wood, but so far in ~300 miles it has performed flawlessly. Not loving the fact that Shimano doesn't facilitate maintenance on these motors but hoping I got something reliable that will last a long time if I treat it right....

I almost gave up on getting an e-bike because I was so worried about this. Now of course I hope things go well but it's been such an amazing experience that if I have to replace a motor or battery after the 2 year warranty is up, I'll be bummed but it will still have been worth it.
 

Husky430

E*POWAH Master
Jul 8, 2019
570
945
Glasshouse Mts - Australia
Plenty of people have had great runs with their Shimano motored ebikes, just me personally and my mate as well, have had horror stories with our e8000 motors.
Saying that, we did cannibalise my dead motor that just stopped over night with my mates motor and made one good one from the 2 dead ones.
Mates motor was making horrible bearing grinding noises which was coming from the actual electric motor part of the engine.
Unfortunately, due to how it must be assembled, its behind a circuit board that is soldered into place and can't be pulled apart to replace the bearings without much more experience than he or I have.
My motor just stopped dead overnight so figured it was something to do with the torque sensor. So we pulled the torque sensor from my mates motor and put it into my motor and away it went. If only Shimano made there motors so you could get at bearings and maybe sold things like circuit boards, torque sensor units so that they could be repaired after they run out of warrranty.
 

calnearlyebike

New Member
Feb 8, 2024
4
3
warrington
One more question , what is the decay (if that’s the right word ) of the batteries like ? I like to keep my bikes for 3/4 years and the cost of an Ebike it might be even longer. Have you had to replace one yet ? 500 cycles they reckon but what will the state of the battery be like after say 100-200-300 cycles ?
 

G-Sport

Active member
Oct 7, 2022
230
178
Yorkshire
I broadly agree.
And I don't think it would be unreasonable to expect longer warranties.

I'd like to see every company list all the parts as spares with clear prices and compatibility notes. This would also let riders upgrade which could get them more sales.
It might well end up being a case of a purchaser weighing up a BrandX motor with a 4 year warranty, and a £800 price for a new motor; against a BrandZ motor with a 2 year warranty but a £500 replacement motor price.
I think a lot of the problems aren't just with the motors necessarily but with screens/control-units and handlebar controls and batteries and the cables that link them all together too.
And motors should be designed so that the main crank bearings can be replaced relatively easily. No-one expects a BB on a "normal" MTB to last much more than a year (in tough/wet conditions) if that; so why should a motor be much different.
I think Rocky Mountain have a good approach here. The BB is easy to work on and the torque sensing is through a simple tension arm so that should make it easy to seal all the electronics very separately to the mechanical parts.
This also requires that manufacturers sort out the software/firmware side. If we can buy parts then we need to be able to update firmware to install them.

This would save a lot of parts and bikes ending up in landfill/recycling
 

franciscoasismm

Active member
May 31, 2021
189
212
Badajoz
There are DUE8000 with many kilometers and no problems. The engine should never be flushed with pressurized water

FB_IMG_1707573440872.jpg IMG_20230815_094541.jpg FB_IMG_1707575622604~2.jpg
 

Bontee

Member
Dec 6, 2020
70
44
warwickshire
Why is there no publicly available data on motor reliability by brand and model ?

This may seem a bit of a rant but it is based on true experience

Manufacturers seem to build a wall of silence and I have found no data to support any buyer of an EMTB in selecting the best motor (reliability) which is a key part of a very expensive purchase. We are paying nearly as much for EMTBs as a small family car yet have to take on trust that the motor will be reliable for the life of the bike. Who would buy a new car without reliable information on dealer and manufacturer support to maintain and service the most costly component i.e. the engine / motor ? At least on a car you can service the engine and rely upon the electrics being fit to use in all weathers and conditions !

I may be jaundiced by the fact that I have had 4 total motor failures on 2 bikes in 5 years - 3 Shimano E8000 and 1 Shimano EP8 but surely I can't just be unlucky!! The concept of Shimano Service Centres is wholly flawed as they are not able to service anything, just charge you for the benefit of diagnosing something (which should be available via their App ) and then charging to remove the motor and return it to Shimano. And that is when it is within the warranty period ! I am certainly looking to avoid Shimano on any future EMTB but how can I avoid similar problems when selecting an alternative motor ?

I take great care of all of the electrics but it seems that there is not even basic IP66 protection from water and dust ingress ( hurrah for Specilaized for their IP56 certifed SL motors but where is the rest of the industry?)

Ebikes are deisgned to be ridden in all varieties of dry , wet, dusty and muddy conditions but it seems most motors are not fit for purpose leaving the internal electronics very vulnerable to ingress of dust and dampness.

Unfortunately bike reviewers are also culpable in their obsession with relative power and feel without any guidance on proven relaiobility and support.

My (very costly and frustrating) experience has negatively tainted my enthusiasm for all things EMTB as it is a wonderful sport - until the motor goes wrong. So let's get some proper information to support consumers and also push for proper long term warranties from motor manufacturers and/or the bike manufacturers.
Sorry to hear that DMO,Unlucky 4 times does seem unlikely ,on the other hand I have a two and a half year old ep8 with nearly 3000 miles on it and has been ridden through the most appalling conditions.Rivers, fords ,winter mud and torrential rain and has been perfect from the first turn of the cranks,,There really seems to be no rhyme or reason to failures I know four other ep8 riders who have similar experience to me and some are riding older motors than mine with higher mileages.
On the other hand I know of a couple of guys who have had multiple bosch failures,I don’t have any brand loyalty DMO,I would have bought my bike whichever motor it came with,I said as much in another post.
 
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franciscoasismm

Active member
May 31, 2021
189
212
Badajoz
10 motors (e8000) over 5 years on 3 bikes. Latest motor bearings getting a bit bad after 4000km.
6 years on an ebike 36,000 km and only one change of DUE8000 at 23,430 km because it starts to make a lot of noise. Never change bearings or clean with pressurized water. I always have a backup engine from Andrzej Wodejszo for my peace of mind ;)
 
Last edited:

franciscoasismm

Active member
May 31, 2021
189
212
Badajoz
I don't even own a pressure washer. Probably a total of approx 50k km on all motors
6 years on an ebike 36,000 km and only one change of DUE8000 at 23,430 km because it starts to make a lot of noise. Never change bearings or clean with pressurized water. I always have a backup engine from Andrzej Wodejszo for my peace of mind ;)
 

Ou812

Active member
Jun 26, 2022
576
384
Fort William
A good mate owns a shop that sells bikes with Shimano, Bosch and Fazua motors. He’s always told me to buy something with a Bosch motor over the rest. He says to avoid Fazua like the plague, he stopped selling the shuttle SL for a bit because they were having so many issues. The rumour is Fazua has replaced over a 1000 motors in the US alone since the Shuttle SL release.
 
Aug 1, 2020
11
18
cumbria
It would be extremely interesting to see an actual true return rate and reason for motor from manufacturers but unfortunately they refuse to release such information.

However I obviously repair all motors and can say they all suffer failure rates and I see them come in waves where one month I will have a load of Bosch with issues or then the next shimano but all of them do suffer and do come into us for repairs or servicing.

We have pushed brands to talk with us for servicing an we are only just getting places with this officially but there are still some that aren’t interested in working with us even though we continue to fix their motors. We could also help them with the common issues that we find and potentially build a better product.
What I would also like to see would be brand perfect a motor and system before making a new one as it seem every few years they bring something new out but it’s no more reliable than the previous generation.
 

steve_sordy

Wedding Crasher
Nov 5, 2018
8,252
8,463
Lincolnshire, UK
My first emtb was in 2019and it had an e8000 motor. The data that came with it spoke of 1000 recharge cycles before the battery charge fell to 90%. I wish that I had kept that hard copy, because I sure can't find that on the internet anymore. Now people are mentioning 500 recharge cycles!

I have had one e8000 and one EP8 and I have had zero motor problems.

I wonder if something else is at play here in addition to the motor brand?
The rider (weight for example) and their mechanical sympathy?
Where they ride, how they ride and what they ride through? (rivers and so forth)
How do they look after the bike?
When you have one rider going through multiple motors, is it always the motor?
:unsure::unsure:
 

arTNC

New Member
Feb 1, 2024
70
119
Texas
It would be extremely interesting to see an actual true return rate and reason for motor from manufacturers but unfortunately they refuse to release such information.

However I obviously repair all motors and can say they all suffer failure rates and I see them come in waves where one month I will have a load of Bosch with issues or then the next shimano but all of them do suffer and do come into us for repairs or servicing.

We have pushed brands to talk with us for servicing an we are only just getting places with this officially but there are still some that aren’t interested in working with us even though we continue to fix their motors. We could also help them with the common issues that we find and potentially build a better product.
What I would also like to see would be brand perfect a motor and system before making a new one as it seem every few years they bring something new out but it’s no more reliable than the previous generation.
Interesting...and disappointing to hear their responses. Since you're actually opening up these motors, can you as a mechanic speak to how easy...or less difficult...the actual servicing of certain motors turns out to be for the kinds of failures you mainly see? You know...lots of special tools required, bearings somewhat easily accessible, parts available, electrical (like circuit boards) or actual mechanical failures ( bearings, gears) being the more common service needed.

I'm a long time motorcycle and automotive mechanic...self taught, not as my career profession...so I can appreciate your insight into what you see going on in the mainstream emtb motors. Don't be shy...tell us what you see if you can. I worked for lots of years doing part time mechanic work at a motorcycle shop and a bike shop to pay for my habit...LOL!

I had a pleasant experience opening up the Bafang BBSHD motor that I did a mid-drive conversion on a 2003 Bullit frame. I just finished riding that bike for 3 years on real mountain bike terrain, and I was frankly shocked how well the whole package worked. I was also fairly impressed when I opened the motor for lubrication service of the gears at about the 1.5 year mark...and to replace one of the main nylon gears with a steel unit. I expected to see total junk in there, but honestly it was fairly simple and quite robust. The nylon gear that I was fearful of was still in perfect shape. I put it all back together and have ridden it for another 1.5 years with no issue.

While it was only a cadence driven assist, after simple programming with the Luna Cycle cable on a laptop, it became very easy to ride and ride aggressively. I just got a Rail 7 to replace it, but not because the motor or bike failed. Old Bullits were tough beasts...LOL!

Please, share detail on specific motors and the issues I mentioned above.
 

arTNC

New Member
Feb 1, 2024
70
119
Texas
My first emtb was in 2019and it had an e8000 motor. The data that came with it spoke of 1000 recharge cycles before the battery charge fell to 90%. I wish that I had kept that hard copy, because I sure can't find that on the internet anymore. Now people are mentioning 500 recharge cycles!

I have had one e8000 and one EP8 and I have had zero motor problems.

I wonder if something else is at play here in addition to the motor brand?
The rider (weight for example) and their mechanical sympathy?
Where they ride, how they ride and what they ride through? (rivers and so forth)
How do they look after the bike?
When you have one rider going through multiple motors, is it always the motor?
:unsure::unsure:
Good question. I ride in Turbo all the time on my new Rail 7 in real off road conditions...but not mud/water. I raced dirt motor enduros in our Texas state circuit for decades, and I've had my fill of having to ride/race in slop and deep water crossings. I no longer need to abuse myself or my machines...but still do ride dirt motors. I do, however, ride hard so my Rail will be somewhat put to the test over time, especially battery life.

I had Santa Cruz Bullits and a Nomad as my pedal-only bikes in most recent years, and then I converted the Bullit to a mid-drive Bafang and hammered the heck out of it for the last 3 years. That battery is a 17.5AH, 52-volt unit put together by an outfit here in the U.S. in Pennsylvania called Bicycle Motor Works...some form of LG batteries. Even after 3 years of heavy use and no telling how many charge cycles, that battery shows little weakness and that amazes me.

Another thing on emtb battery life is that as I understand it, it's not good to leave any emtb battery in a full state of charge or at a zero or near zero level of charge for any substantial amount of time. Also with my Bicycle Motor Works battery I had a charger from Luna Cycle in California that allowed you to choose the percentage of level of charge...like 70%, 80%, 90%, or full. They say this lengthens the life span of the battery. I never had to exceed 90% charging. It also had a digital readout that showed the charge rate and levels. Hey, I'm no electrical or chemical engineer when it comes to these emtb batteries, so these are just lay person's observations and experiences.

The Bosch charger for my Rail appears to be a very basic and "maybe" a somewhat "dumb" charger...doesn't even have a light to show it's plugged in...but again there may be some very wiz-bang stuff going on in there that really cares for their battery pack, and that wouldn't surprise me.
 

Spiff

Active member
Feb 27, 2019
410
232
Earth
My first emtb was in 2019and it had an e8000 motor. The data that came with it spoke of 1000 recharge cycles before the battery charge fell to 90%. I wish that I had kept that hard copy, because I sure can't find that on the internet anymore. Now people are mentioning 500 recharge cycles!
Here it is....

Shimano Battery Warranty EN.jpg
 
Aug 1, 2020
11
18
cumbria
Interesting...and disappointing to hear their responses. Since you're actually opening up these motors, can you as a mechanic speak to how easy...or less difficult...the actual servicing of certain motors turns out to be for the kinds of failures you mainly see? You know...lots of special tools required, bearings somewhat easily accessible, parts available, electrical (like circuit boards) or actual mechanical failures ( bearings, gears) being the more common service needed.

I'm a long time motorcycle and automotive mechanic...self taught, not as my career profession...so I can appreciate your insight into what you see going on in the mainstream emtb motors. Don't be shy...tell us what you see if you can. I worked for lots of years doing part time mechanic work at a motorcycle shop and a bike shop to pay for my habit...LOL!

I had a pleasant experience opening up the Bafang BBSHD motor that I did a mid-drive conversion on a 2003 Bullit frame. I just finished riding that bike for 3 years on real mountain bike terrain, and I was frankly shocked how well the whole package worked. I was also fairly impressed when I opened the motor for lubrication service of the gears at about the 1.5 year mark...and to replace one of the main nylon gears with a steel unit. I expected to see total junk in there, but honestly it was fairly simple and quite robust. The nylon gear that I was fearful of was still in perfect shape. I put it all back together and have ridden it for another 1.5 years with no issue.

While it was only a cadence driven assist, after simple programming with the Luna Cycle cable on a laptop, it became very easy to ride and ride aggressively. I just got a Rail 7 to replace it, but not because the motor or bike failed. Old Bullits were tough beasts...LOL!

Please, share detail on specific motors and the issues I mentioned above.
Some motors are easier than other yes. Ones like bafang as easy to work with due to most components being separate to others where as one like Bosch it’s all in the same compartment and requires full strip down of the motor just to get to the bearings. Shimano can be similar but many have broken a perfectly working motor trying to service Shimano motors. This then leads me to saying majority of the motors can be broken if you don’t know what you’re doing. YouTube videos also aren’t advised to follow as some advise you incorrectly how to open Shimano motors and in turn breaking them.

Internal parts are a lot more complex on the leading brands and can often be loaded with software that can be tricky to work with if trying to replace parts such as torque sensors. Bearings again can be non standard either with sizes or with modifications such as Yamaha where they have an additional o ring to help keep the bearing located and add extra barrier to reduce water ingress.

All the leading brands also refuse to sell parts which has left us and others to remanufacture parts. We make several parts now for a few different motors including E7000 plastic drive gears that is common to break.
 

arTNC

New Member
Feb 1, 2024
70
119
Texas
Some motors are easier than other yes. Ones like bafang as easy to work with due to most components being separate to others where as one like Bosch it’s all in the same compartment and requires full strip down of the motor just to get to the bearings. Shimano can be similar but many have broken a perfectly working motor trying to service Shimano motors. This then leads me to saying majority of the motors can be broken if you don’t know what you’re doing. YouTube videos also aren’t advised to follow as some advise you incorrectly how to open Shimano motors and in turn breaking them.

Internal parts are a lot more complex on the leading brands and can often be loaded with software that can be tricky to work with if trying to replace parts such as torque sensors. Bearings again can be non standard either with sizes or with modifications such as Yamaha where they have an additional o ring to help keep the bearing located and add extra barrier to reduce water ingress.

All the leading brands also refuse to sell parts which has left us and others to remanufacture parts. We make several parts now for a few different motors including E7000 plastic drive gears that is common to break.
Well good on you for taking the initiative and effort to pursue this. Unfortunate that they won't supply parts for motors that are out of warranty. Makes me wonder what skin off their nose would be at issue. I'd hate think it was sheer greed, but...

To me, not supplying parts to the motor of an ebike is like GM not selling parts for their LS/LT line of engines. Even the evil PRC sell parts to their Bafangs. :ROFLMAO: Thank you for the response. It sheds light on some things I was curious about. I did enjoy watching the YT vid of that Yorkshire(?) bike mechanic fellow over in your neck of the woods totally disassemble and reassemble a Bosch-4 motor even though he didn't recommend it. I think he mentioned that he just sends motors to an outsourced shop or such...heck, maybe it's your outfit...LOL! I know nothing about the fellow as far as his cred or not, but the motor teardown and reassembly was interesting.
 
Aug 1, 2020
11
18
cumbria
Well good on you for taking the initiative and effort to pursue this. Unfortunate that they won't supply parts for motors that are out of warranty. Makes me wonder what skin off their nose would be at issue. I'd hate think it was sheer greed, but...

To me, not supplying parts to the motor of an ebike is like GM not selling parts for their LS/LT line of engines. Even the evil PRC sell parts to their Bafangs. :ROFLMAO: Thank you for the response. It sheds light on some things I was curious about. I did enjoy watching the YT vid of that Yorkshire(?) bike mechanic fellow over in your neck of the woods totally disassemble and reassemble a Bosch-4 motor even though he didn't recommend it. I think he mentioned that he just sends motors to an outsourced shop or such...heck, maybe it's your outfit...LOL! I know nothing about the fellow as far as his cred or not, but the motor teardown and reassembly was interesting.
Well this was a broken motor and same goes for some of his other videos use broken motors so he can’t guarantee they work after so not really a good video to follow.

As for the manufacturers not supporting us and supplying parts it is baffling as they wouldn’t hold any liability on repairs and they could make money out of selling parts where as now we make money out of supplying remanufactured parts and they get nothing of that.
 

lovespicyfood

New Member
Nov 24, 2023
38
10
California
Interesting specs, 80% after 500 charges doesn't sound great. Is that the spec for today's batteries? I'm trying to baby my battery, keeping it ~60% when I'm not using it. I have it on a smart plug and charge it the morning of to 100% when I know I need it. I have never gone completely to 0%, I think the lowest I've gotten to is ~10%. I have a 900 watt battery so I usually am able to get at least two rides before worry about charging. With that much battery, I think the very worst case scenario of 20miles per charge at 500 cycles would equal over 10,000 miles so I feel pretty good about longevity...
 

Spiff

Active member
Feb 27, 2019
410
232
Earth
Interesting specs, 80% after 500 charges doesn't sound great. Is that the spec for today's batteries? I'm trying to baby my battery, keeping it ~60% when I'm not using it. I have it on a smart plug and charge it the morning of to 100% when I know I need it. I have never gone completely to 0%, I think the lowest I've gotten to is ~10%. I have a 900 watt battery so I usually am able to get at least two rides before worry about charging. With that much battery, I think the very worst case scenario of 20miles per charge at 500 cycles would equal over 10,000 miles so I feel pretty good about longevity...
80% at 500 cycles is very good compared to the real Shimano batteries.

I had a Shimano 504Wh BT-E8010 that after 80 Cycles had a degradation of 76%, then Shimano removed the degradation number from etube diagnostic after V4.0.3 .

But it still could be read using STunlocker, and take into account that when reading degradation value from the battery, the data path is: Battery->Motor->Display->BT->Cell.

As battery FW is not upgradeable it was not possible for Shimano to "improve" the degradation number calculation in the battery, so Shimano fix was to release a motor FW upgrade 4.9.4 (For E8000, but EP6 and EP8 have a similar FW upgrade) that when degradation data was transfered to the motor, it changed the degradation number from 76% to 86% , so it was not covered by the battery warranty.

My current bike does not have Shimano motor.
 
Last edited:

Bontee

Member
Dec 6, 2020
70
44
warwickshire
It would be extremely interesting to see an actual true return rate and reason for motor from manufacturers but unfortunately they refuse to release such information.

However I obviously repair all motors and can say they all suffer failure rates and I see them come in waves where one month I will have a load of Bosch with issues or then the next shimano but all of them do suffer and do come into us for repairs or servicing.

We have pushed brands to talk with us for servicing an we are only just getting places with this officially but there are still some that aren’t interested in working with us even though we continue to fix their motors. We could also help them with the common issues that we find and potentially build a better product.
What I would also like to see would be brand perfect a motor and system before making a new one as it seem every few years they bring something new out but it’s no more reliable than the previous generation.
Hello Ebike repairs,Is the issue with the shimano motors ,specifically the ep8,a software issue,am I correct in assuming that the ep8 would be a straightforward motor to service if it wasn’t for the software crashing on disassembly.
 

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