Bike Storage Rack

Cell4soul

E*POWAH Master
Jul 11, 2022
423
1,160
Mesa, AZ
I had a request on another thread to post photos of my bike storage rack. The rack was very simple. Here is a basic material list:

- Unistrut (2 pieces)
- 1” x 6” pine planks (equal quantity to the number of bikes)
- Lag Bolts (1.25“ length is good)
- Unistrut hardware (nut inserts and bolts)
- front bike wheel mounts

Lag bolt the unistrut to the wall using lags. Find studs. Bolt the 1 x 6 to the Unistrut nut inserts and bolts. Lag bolt the front wheel mount to the 1 x 6.

Here are some photos:

F83A8FC4-1A2C-4152-AABB-DD0A20053085.jpeg 54DF7DED-81E1-405B-A62A-E15C65F2054C.jpeg 4233F8CA-6EE7-4EDF-86A1-8B8B9F365639.jpeg EF993D2F-0C4D-4975-B5F4-A4F39292CFB2.jpeg 5FFBCE92-CD1A-42E0-B914-5F87E3736994.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Arminius

Well-known member
Subscriber
Jul 26, 2022
344
506
Rhein-Ruhr Delta, Germany
I had a request on another thread to post photos of my bike storage rack. The rack was very simple. Here is a basic material list:

- Unistrut (2 pieces)
- 1” x 6” pine planks (equal quantity to the number of bikes)
- Lag Bolts (1.25“ length is good)
- Unistrut hardware (nut inserts and bolts)
- front bike wheel mounts

Lag bolt the unistrut to the wall using lags. Find studs. Bolt the 1 x 6 to the Unistrut nut inserts and bolts. Lag bolt the front wheel mount to the 1 x 6.

Here are some photos:

View attachment 102591 View attachment 102592 View attachment 102593 View attachment 102594 View attachment 102595
Cool! Thanks for sharing. 👍 I am allowed to push my bike through the living room to the large terrace in 3rd floor to do maintenance and cleaning. Sometimes. ☺️
 

MOTO13

Active member
Sep 16, 2020
285
319
Elkhorn, Wi
Nice system. I have heard that it is not good to store a bike inverted for any length of time. Not good for the suspension seals (can can cause leaks etc.)....anyone have an opinion on this? I'd like to store mine similarly, just don't want problems.
 

Cell4soul

E*POWAH Master
Jul 11, 2022
423
1,160
Mesa, AZ
Nice system. I have heard that it is not good to store a bike inverted for any length of time. Not good for the suspension seals (can can cause leaks etc.)....anyone have an opinion on this? I'd like to store mine similarly, just don't want problems.
So far I’ve had no issues with storing the bikes this way. I’ll post back up if something comes up.
 

Binhill1

🍊 Tango Man 🍊
Mar 7, 2019
2,481
3,575
Scotland
I snuck mine in once when she was away for the night . Jumped everytime I heard a car going past the house , never again.
 

Stihldog

Handheld Power Tool
Subscriber
Jun 10, 2020
2,836
3,972
Coquitlam, BC
It’s tragic when you enter your bike store room and find your precious bike laying on the floor. Something failed and someone’s to blame. (Probably you).

I’m not a structural engineer but I have some knowledge in the construction industry (tree falling was my career) and acquired a number of related certifications over the years. The branches of skills required for any trade can be endless. I’ll try not to wander out of my lane.

I tell my wife that I’m only a “Fastener” with a little bit of knowledge. There’s only a billion + fasteners available but how they are used is important. Nails, screws, bolts , adhesives etc (the list is huge). Every factor or possibility needs to be considered, otherwise the results can be tragic.

Consider the wall or ceiling that you’re mounting to. Wooden wall studs, sheet rock, concrete, brick, cinder blocks, plywood, OSB etc. They all require different types of fasteners or fastening methods. Choose the correct one, otherwise the result can be tragic.

I’m mostly faced with wall studs or a concrete wall. Easy right? Not always. Locating the centre of a wooden stud or ceiling joist through sheet rock is important. A stud finder is helpful …but not always accurate. Once the general location of a stud is found, a series of small holes nailed on either side of the stud can determine the correct centre. Mark that spot with a pencil. Now you can transfer hole location vertically. Check those also. Most stud walls are spaced consistently on a horizontal plane. 16” or 24” is typical …but not always. (8”, 10”, 19 5/16”, 32” can happen).just depends on the structure.

Concrete holes must be drilled accurately. A hammer drill and properly sized concrete bits are required. The type of fastener is very important. Sometimes I’ve added a special type of epoxy to help secure the metal fastener into the concrete hole.


IMG_7426.jpeg

IMG_7424.jpeg

IMG_7423.jpeg

There’s usually instructions and a number of caveats for each type of bike hanger. The caveats may seem insignificant but they are written in to CYA, and theirs.

I won’t use some types of bike hangers for different reasons. Weight of bike, hanging method, mounting options.

So I use the Steady Rack. It pivots the bike, supports the weight nicely, keeps the rear wheel off the floor, folds up and out of the way, looks nice. 👍🏻
 

RacerX

New Member
Nov 19, 2023
15
21
Austin Texas
Well I have to say that is a dream come true bike storage and nice bike selection. Great item hanging on the chair. Go Sooners!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I just had my last 2 kids graduate from there. 3 kids total and all went to OU..
 

Prairie Dog

Active member
Subscriber
Mar 25, 2021
65
330
Alberta, Canada
Most homeowners in my hood have their cars parked out on their driveways and in most cases it’s simply due to the fact that they have too much stuff scattered around on their garage floors. I was facing the same dilemma over a decade ago so I installed slatwall on three sides of the interior of our garage along with some much-needed storage space. And it isn’t just limited to bikes though there are times that I wish that it was.

P4112105.JPG

IMG_20200923_1126058.jpg
 

Binhill1

🍊 Tango Man 🍊
Mar 7, 2019
2,481
3,575
Scotland
It’s tragic when you enter your bike store room and find your precious bike laying on the floor. Something failed and someone’s to blame. (Probably you).

I’m not a structural engineer but I have some knowledge in the construction industry (tree falling was my career) and acquired a number of related certifications over the years. The branches of skills required for any trade can be endless. I’ll try not to wander out of my lane.

I tell my wife that I’m only a “Fastener” with a little bit of knowledge. There’s only a billion + fasteners available but how they are used is important. Nails, screws, bolts , adhesives etc (the list is huge). Every factor or possibility needs to be considered, otherwise the results can be tragic.

Consider the wall or ceiling that you’re mounting to. Wooden wall studs, sheet rock, concrete, brick, cinder blocks, plywood, OSB etc. They all require different types of fasteners or fastening methods. Choose the correct one, otherwise the result can be tragic.

I’m mostly faced with wall studs or a concrete wall. Easy right? Not always. Locating the centre of a wooden stud or ceiling joist through sheet rock is important. A stud finder is helpful …but not always accurate. Once the general location of a stud is found, a series of small holes nailed on either side of the stud can determine the correct centre. Mark that spot with a pencil. Now you can transfer hole location vertically. Check those also. Most stud walls are spaced consistently on a horizontal plane. 16” or 24” is typical …but not always. (8”, 10”, 19 5/16”, 32” can happen).just depends on the structure.

Concrete holes must be drilled accurately. A hammer drill and properly sized concrete bits are required. The type of fastener is very important. Sometimes I’ve added a special type of epoxy to help secure the metal fastener into the concrete hole.


View attachment 134251

View attachment 134252

View attachment 134253

There’s usually instructions and a number of caveats for each type of bike hanger. The caveats may seem insignificant but they are written in to CYA, and theirs.

I won’t use some types of bike hangers for different reasons. Weight of bike, hanging method, mounting options.

So I use the Steady Rack. It pivots the bike, supports the weight nicely, keeps the rear wheel off the floor, folds up and out of the way, looks nice. 👍🏻
Well heavier load bigger nails was what I always went by. Very tidy looking work shop you have there i have to say .Tree falling well I was a tree feller for a few winters when offshore work was thin but your trees were probably bigger. I am not allowed to do much DIY at home saying that I fitted a new lavie seat three days ago and it's still OK. I was a Fisherman for many years you find most of them are useless about the house .
 

Stihldog

Handheld Power Tool
Subscriber
Jun 10, 2020
2,836
3,972
Coquitlam, BC
Most homeowners in my hood have their cars parked out on their driveways and in most cases it’s simply due to the fact that they have too much stuff scattered around on their garage floors. I was facing the same dilemma over a decade ago so I installed slatwall on three sides of the interior of our garage along with some much-needed storage space. And it isn’t just limited to bikes though there are times that I wish that it was.

View attachment 134261
View attachment 134262
Nice setup! I always like looking at other garages/bikeshops. Gives me a few ideas.

Here’s my Cave. It was basically a concrete hole at the back of the garage. Then I got busy. Or I tried. Had a stroke before I got things really going. Spent 6 months in the hospital (don’t remember much of that). When I returned home all the cabinets were delivered. My left side was seriously compromised. Basically installed everything here with one good hand and leg. It was good physiotherapy.

The concrete walls were all strapped with 1x3 fir before everything was installed.

IMG_7431.jpeg

Slat wall and bike racks.
IMG_7432.jpeg


Wall of shame and some storage.
IMG_7433.jpeg

Shop compressor and dry room.
IMG_7427.jpeg
I spend a bit of time here so it’s a bit dirty …but it’s tidy.👍🏻
 

Prairie Dog

Active member
Subscriber
Mar 25, 2021
65
330
Alberta, Canada
Nice setup! I always like looking at other garages/bikeshops. Gives me a few ideas.

Here’s my Cave. It was basically a concrete hole at the back of the garage. Then I got busy. Or I tried. Had a stroke before I got things really going. Spent 6 months in the hospital (don’t remember much of that). When I returned home all the cabinets were delivered. My left side was seriously compromised. Basically installed everything here with one good hand and leg. It was good physiotherapy.

The concrete walls were all strapped with 1x3 fir before everything was installed.

View attachment 134266
Slat wall and bike racks.
View attachment 134267

Wall of shame and some storage.
View attachment 134268

Shop compressor and dry room.
View attachment 134269
I spend a bit of time here so it’s a bit dirty …but it’s tidy.👍🏻
Sweet looking space. Far less cluttered and much tidier than mine. One thing that I am missing is a shop stool but there’s not another inch of room to spare for even for that.

PXL_20240211_203337043.jpg
 

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