No way I can get a 2.5 DHF front tyre on rim. Anyone done this?

Doug Stampfer

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2018
736
751
NZ
Thought I'd just quickly change the crap stock to a nice shiny DHF. i'm using a tube because I've not had any good results with stans. I've watched a few youtube vids with people going 'oh yes it can be quite hard' & popping them on with their hands but I''m calling bullshit on that my tyre has a good 50mm to stretch before it even looks at the side of the rim
 

Twlpyn

New Member
Jun 7, 2020
24
20
Llandeilo
I haven’t tried with an inner tube in the tyre as I run tubeless but the best way to work some slack in the tyre is to push the tyre bead to the centre of the rim. Do this for the bead already on the rim, as well as the one you’re trying to get on. Work around the tyre from the opposite side of the section which isn’t over the rim, pressing the tyre beads towards the middle of the rim and working your way around the tyre. Each time you do this You should get a bit more slack and eventually be able to get the bead onto the rim. Good luck.
 

Shane(NZ)

Active member
Sep 4, 2019
179
140
NewZealand
Tube makes no difference to how hard tyre is to fit.
You are having trouble fitting the tyre on the rim? Or pumping it up to seat on bead?
I normally do on and off by hand sometimes need a lever, my rims are 30mm and 40mm wide I.d maybe the wider rims make it easier.
 

Rusty

E*POWAH BOSS
Jul 17, 2019
1,513
1,673
New Zealand
Only ever had 1 tire I could not get on needing more than hands since I moved from 26".
What is the tire currently on the bike?
 

Akiwi

🐸 Kermit Elite 🐸
Feb 6, 2019
986
1,286
Olching, Germany
I used to have problems, before I thought about it.
Make sure the bead of the tire is in the middle of the rim well (Lowest point) on the opposite side of the wheel before trying to get the last bit of the bead over the edge. This will give you enough free room to be able to do it with bare hands. THe tube makes it a little more difficult, but not much.
I found this picture.
1591786312698.png

Something like that anyway. Just important to use the deepest part of the rim.
 

Sofaboy73

Member
May 26, 2020
68
34
UK
Is this on the original Bontrager rims that came on the bike? If so, do they still have the plastic rim strip inserts in them that make them tubeless ready? If so, cut them out (you can always use stans tape or similar to re-tape if you want to go tubeless) and you’ll have a far easier job. They’re too deep and made it impossible for me to get a tyre on when I punctured first ride out on my rail (was too impatient to convert it to tubeless before first ride). Only time I’ve failed to get a tyre back on trail side in 30 years of MTB
 

Doug Stampfer

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2018
736
751
NZ
Is this on the original Bontrager rims that came on the bike? If so, do they still have the plastic rim strip inserts in them that make them tubeless ready? If so, cut them out (you can always use stans tape or similar to re-tape if you want to go tubeless) and you’ll have a far easier job. They’re too deep and made it impossible for me to get a tyre on when I punctured first ride out on my rail (was too impatient to convert it to tubeless before first ride). Only time I’ve failed to get a tyre back on trail side in 30 years of MTB
Yes exactly. The beads won't go into the centre of the rim to give you slack at the outside edge because the plastic rim insert has no central groove for the beads to sit in. Because the bike came with a tube I thought I could still get the new tyre & tube on however with the harder casing of the Minions... no luck for me. Reminded me of trying to wedge a new knobbly on my old BMW motorbike with metal tyre levers launching themselves across workshop.
I'll take it to the bike shop & get a tubeless setup put in as I'd be annoyed to find a pinched tube after all that & also I certainly wouldn't be able to replace a tube trackside with these tyres. Be great to have some confident rubber on!
 

Mabman

E*POWAH Elite World Champion
Feb 28, 2018
1,048
1,735
Oregon USA
Not trying to be an arse but are you sure you have the right size BSD tyre? 50mm is alot and I've never seen that much of a discrepancy before and although the aforementioned method is correct it won't get you that much.
 

Sofaboy73

Member
May 26, 2020
68
34
UK
Yes exactly. The beads won't go into the centre of the rim to give you slack at the outside edge because the plastic rim insert has no central groove for the beads to sit in. Because the bike came with a tube I thought I could still get the new tyre & tube on however with the harder casing of the Minions... no luck for me. Reminded me of trying to wedge a new knobbly on my old BMW motorbike with metal tyre levers launching themselves across workshop.
I'll take it to the bike shop & get a tubeless setup put in as I'd be annoyed to find a pinched tube after all that & also I certainly wouldn't be able to replace a tube trackside with these tyres. Be great to have some confident rubber on!

it’ll definitely be the plastic rim strips. They’re hateful things. I had a similar c 40mm that there wasn’t a hope in hell I was going to get on to the rim. Since getting rid of the strips and replacing with tape I can fit tyres by hand without levers. God knows how they get them on when building the bikes up. Easy to set up tubeless yourself if you’ve got a compressor or airshot or similar
 

Doug Stampfer

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2018
736
751
NZ
Not trying to be an arse but are you sure you have the right size BSD tyre? 50mm is alot and I've never seen that much of a discrepancy before and although the aforementioned method is correct it won't get you that much.
Ok I may have been frustrated at the time. It may have been 25mm or so but realise the plastic strips do take up a fair bit of depth in the rims
 

Doug Stampfer

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2018
736
751
NZ
it’ll definitely be the plastic rim strips. They’re hateful things. I had a similar c 40mm that there wasn’t a hope in hell I was going to get on to the rim. Since getting rid of the strips and replacing with tape I can fit tyres by hand without levers. God knows how they get them on when building the bikes up. Easy to set up tubeless yourself if you’ve got a compressor or airshot or similar
So do you reckon getting rid of the plastic strips? What are they there for- just instead of rim tape or are they a strengthening thing? I was thinking even with tubeless if the shit hits the fan with the stans stuff out on the trails I couldn't put a tube in with them in, getting rid of them has its appeal.
 

HORSPWR

E*POWAH Master
May 23, 2019
845
672
Alice Springs, Australia
Thought I'd just quickly change the crap stock to a nice shiny DHF. i'm using a tube because I've not had any good results with stans. I've watched a few youtube vids with people going 'oh yes it can be quite hard' & popping them on with their hands but I''m calling bullshit on that my tyre has a good 50mm to stretch before it even looks at the side of the rim
What's been your issues with Stans, every man and his dog runs tubeless and Stans and I don't know of anyone that does that would choose to run a tube again. I get a gazzilion 3 corner jacks when I ride and I've never lost a freckle of air, I recently had 10 weeks off the bike with a broken collarbone and trashed shoulder and my tyres still had 15psi in them when I got back on recently.
 

Sofaboy73

Member
May 26, 2020
68
34
UK
So do you reckon getting rid of the plastic strips? What are they there for- just instead of rim tape or are they a strengthening thing? I was thinking even with tubeless if the shit hits the fan with the stans stuff out on the trails I couldn't put a tube in with them in, getting rid of them has its appeal.

the plastic rim strips are just a cheap & quick way of making the rims airtight at the factory do they are tubless ready. Tubless tape works just as well if you take a bit of care fitting it (5 minute job) and makes it a hell of a lot easier to get tyres on and off as the central rim well is accessible. Yes, I always carry a tube when riding with my tubless set up in case the puncture is too big to seal or plug as a get you home emergency
 

Doug Stampfer

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2018
736
751
NZ
Yes def right tyre I believe. Well insofar as they are 29 2.5s vs the stock 2.6
I went into the bike shop to book my service & the mechanic says he can get it on with his fingers. I nodded & said ok. Reminded me of a moto mechanic telling me the same thing about putting on a MX tyre & me walking back in to find 2 guys grunting on tyre levers while another was wailing on the tyre with a mallet.
As for Stans I got some put in on my old bike & they went flat so got them repaired & they went flat so put tubes back in & never had a problem again.
Thanks for your replies I'll keep you posted
 

HORSPWR

E*POWAH Master
May 23, 2019
845
672
Alice Springs, Australia
Yes def right tyre I believe. Well insofar as they are 29 2.5s vs the stock 2.6
I went into the bike shop to book my service & the mechanic says he can get it on with his fingers. I nodded & said ok. Reminded me of a moto mechanic telling me the same thing about putting on a MX tyre & me walking back in to find 2 guys grunting on tyre levers while another was wailing on the tyre with a mallet.
As for Stans I got some put in on my old bike & they went flat so got them repaired & they went flat so put tubes back in & never had a problem again.
Thanks for your replies I'll keep you posted
Tubeless and Stans is only as good as the rim and valve prep prior to fitting a TR tyre, done correctly (not assuming yours weren't) you loose bugger all air.
 

Bigxmtb

New Member
May 24, 2020
46
42
UK
Tubeless and Stans is only as good as the rim and valve prep prior to fitting a TR tyre, done correctly (not assuming yours weren't) you loose bugger all air.

Having just converted to tubeless for the first time this is for sure correct. I lost a few psi after 2 rides but thats no different from tubes/slime tubes ive had before.

I recently put on 2.6 maxxis DHF onto 30mm rims and had not much issue, they were a little rough to start with and took a little bit of hard pumping to get that to pop into the rim completely but I found starting opposite the valve seemed to work best and then used a tyre lever to get the last few inches on the rim.
 

urastus

⚡The Whippet⚡
May 4, 2020
1,548
993
Tasmania
Yes def right tyre I believe. Well insofar as they are 29 2.5s vs the stock 2.6
I went into the bike shop to book my service & the mechanic says he can get it on with his fingers. I nodded & said ok. Reminded me of a moto mechanic telling me the same thing about putting on a MX tyre & me walking back in to find 2 guys grunting on tyre levers while another was wailing on the tyre with a mallet.
As for Stans I got some put in on my old bike & they went flat so got them repaired & they went flat so put tubes back in & never had a problem again.
Thanks for your replies I'll keep you posted
Going tubeless is definitely a different feel. I found I had to put some more pressure in without a tube - less damping without a tube, and got a pinch flat first ride. Admittedly my home made sealant sealed that 5mm slit - but I hadn't had a puncture with that tyre prior to that. My other bikes still have tubes, simply because I don't get to ride them much and I don't want to worry about the sealant going hard. I don't see tubeless as this amazing advancement either. I will persist with it though. The tyre feel isn't as good - I understand why you need heavier sidewalls now with tubeless; not just for sealing but also for better damping.
 

Cyclopath1000

Active member
Apr 26, 2019
306
123
Davis Ca
Same issue can happen when substituting gorilla tape for 3m type rim tape for tubess. Also occasionally some tire brands tend to be slightly tighter to mount. Usually maxxis tires can be mounted with one large pedroes tire iron... Go get one they are cheap.
 

Gavalar

Active member
Feb 4, 2019
283
173
UK
Thought I'd just quickly change the crap stock to a nice shiny DHF. i'm using a tube because I've not had any good results with stans. I've watched a few youtube vids with people going 'oh yes it can be quite hard' & popping them on with their hands but I''m calling bullshit on that my tyre has a good 50mm to stretch before it even looks at the side of the rim
The method that works for me is to stand on the bottom of the tyre in the upright position, grab the top of the tyre and do some pull ups, do this around the circumference of the tyre, stretching it this way helps to soften it a little so as to get it on the rim, this together with a compressor works a treat for me.
 

Arcadyus

New Member
May 19, 2020
20
11
WA
I'm curious what stock tires you have? My XR5 have been great in the PNW. I also can't imagine riding these bikes without cush cores installed.
 

Arcadyus

New Member
May 19, 2020
20
11
WA
Not just for that. You can run silly low psi. You have way more grip, and can always get home even with a flat. You never have to carry a spare tube again. It gives you basically an inch more of suspension. And takes some vibration away from your arms. Plus yes we have 50lb bikes and when you hit drops cush core helps.
 

Doug Stampfer

Well-known member
Jul 7, 2018
736
751
NZ
I'm curious what stock tires you have? My XR5 have been great in the PNW. I also can't imagine riding these bikes without cush cores installed.
The stock XR5s are on it the moment. I have to admit they did handle yesterdays slippery rooty rock infested ride a lot better than I thought but the confidence I get from minions makes me a better rider. They seem to grip off camber incredibly well.
I find it interesting you run cush cores with the xr5s. I would have thought running a tyre with a thicker sidewall would be more appropriate seeing as the cushcores are for lower PSI & what I imagine harder bike abuse.
I'm also anticipating dropping the PSI down more as I'm trying to work out the best suspension setting for my riding as well. Got it very smooth at the moment but at the expense of bottoming out over some drops.
 

BrentD

Well-known member
Jun 25, 2020
168
133
New Zealand
I'm now running a 2.6 DHF on the front and managed to get it on by (weak office worker) hand even with Cushcore insert. The trick is to remove the plastic rim strip and tape the rim if you are running Cushcore. I have had the Bontrager plastic rim strips before on acoustic bikes and have found them to be no problem however, just take your time to ensure that you have the beads of the tyre right down in the well of the rim and it should pop on fairly easily and always use some soapy water to lubricate the bead and inside of the tyre when fitting.
 

speedkills

Member
May 17, 2020
230
221
Boulder, CO
I have a set of tools that were pretty cheap and intended for motorcycle tires. Probably overkill, but if you ever want the easiest tire changes ever, these make mtb tire changes easy as can be. I only use them for the first mounting for the most part as I find after a tire has been mounted up once and ridden a bit, subsequent remounts tend to be easy. Not telling everyone to go out and buy these, just sharing what I have in my garage that I tend to reach for first.
B509C137-627E-4097-9F2C-A5FD56DE6352.jpeg
7CE7BFC3-622D-443A-B892-284B50C873D0.jpeg
9D81C956-636B-42E5-A082-34603EE5A48B.jpeg
5C66EC5F-9868-4F1B-B2EC-319E75B47C73.jpeg
 

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