Has having an Ebb changed your view on having a battery car?


Has buying an Ebb changed your view on having a battery car?

  • Yes and I’m more likely to buy one.

    Votes: 5 11.4%
  • No. The technology and/or infrastructure isn’t there yet.

    Votes: 21 47.7%
  • No because of cost.

    Votes: 11 25.0%
  • I had the car before the bike!

    Votes: 7 15.9%
  • No. Other reason listed below in my comments.

    Votes: 4 9.1%

  • Total voters
    44

Tubby G

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Tubby G

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Most are just toys for the rich at the moment.
They are indeed, but by manufacturing these electric ‘super cars’ the industry is making electric cars desirable, and will eventually filter down to the masses. VW have already released the iD3, Skoda have the Enyaq coming soon, more will follow
 

stiv674

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They are indeed, but by manufacturing these electric ‘super cars’ the industry is making electric cars desirable, and will eventually filter down to the masses. VW have already released the iD3, Skoda have the Enyaq coming soon, more will follow
I think they're desirable because they're expensive and fast, not necessarily because they're electric.

This drip feeding process is hardly going to get the masses in electric vehicles.
 
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Tubby G

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I think they're desirable because they're expensive and fast, not necessarily because they're electric.

This drip feeding process is hardly going to get the masses in electric vehicles.
I’m not here to convince you to buy an electric car, I don’t work in the industry and we are all entitled to our own opinions, but going by sales numbers the electric car boom has already started. I read recently that on a global scale ICE car sales have been down by around 5%, whereas electric car sales are up by around 40%. China is way ahead, with Northern Europe and the USA not far behind. The UK has always been a bit slow to adapt to changes, but will soon catch up

In terms of desirability, have you ever driven an electric car? They’re a sheer joy. Silent around town and a pure rush of adrenaline when you floor the pedal. As soon as you’ve driven an electric car it just feels like ICE cars are old ‘dirty’ technology. I do like a petrol engine too, I ride motorbikes, and love the sound of a V Twin roaring through the gear changes, but I can’t wait to have my first go on an electric motorbike
 
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R120

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I think they're desirable because they're expensive and fast, not necessarily because they're electric.

This drip feeding process is hardly going to get the masses in electric vehicles.
I actually think you may have inadvertently hit the nail on the head there - all of a sudden there are desirable electric cars out there, and this is what is influencing the market as a whole - when your only options were a Nissan Leaf or a Renault Zoe you where hardly going to ship in your Golf for one, but now we are seeing cars coming out that are perceived as being cool, and thats trickling down the market place and changing the demographic of those looking at buying them.

Ultimately people aren't going to shell out a load of cash for something that isn't cool, a car will always have some element of being a status symbol
 

stiv674

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You don't need to convince me, I want an electric van, no choice at all two years ago when I bought mine, hoping that it improves over the next few years.

Electric cars aren't silent anyway, road noise, wind noise etc
 

R120

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If you take the brapp brapp fake pops and bangs crew out the equation, most car noise is from the tyres
 
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stiv674

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I actually think you may have inadvertently hit the nail on the head there - all of a sudden there are desirable electric cars out there, and this is what is influencing the market as a whole - when your only options were a Nissan Leaf or a Renault Zoe you where hardly going to ship in your Golf for one, but now we are seeing cars coming out that are perceived as being cool, and thats trickling down the market place and changing the demographic of those looking at buying them.

Ultimately people aren't going to shell out a load of cash for something that isn't cool, a car will always have some element of being a status symbol
Yes true but that's a very limited market sector, to really make a difference we need more affordable options.
 

Tubby G

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Electric cars aren't silent anyway, road noise, wind noise etc
That’s why I said silent around town. Stealth mode activated! Although now I believe you have to have an electronic ‘sound’ by law when driving under 30mph for safety for pedestrians
 

stiv674

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That’s why I said silent around town. Stealth mode activated! Although now I believe you have to have an electronic ‘sound’ by law when driving under 30mph for safety for pedestrians
Not in towns I drive through, bang crash every five seconds, I hope the suspension on EVs is well damped :p
 
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Darren

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I actually think you may have inadvertently hit the nail on the head there - all of a sudden there are desirable electric cars out there, and this is what is influencing the market as a whole - when your only options were a Nissan Leaf or a Renault Zoe you where hardly going to ship in your Golf for one, but now we are seeing cars coming out that are perceived as being cool, and thats trickling down the market place and changing the demographic of those looking at buying them.

Ultimately people aren't going to shell out a load of cash for something that isn't cool, a car will always have some element of being a status symbol
Interestingly, the Prius was deliberately designed to look "nerdy" to appeal to the "tree hugger" type early adopters back in the day.
Not every sector or demographic is looking for cool looking cars - if they were all cars would look cool. Design is not an accident.
 

>moto<

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the only reason renewables are there, is because they are being subsidised, not because they are economically viable. There's not a single business model in existance that could provide for the power generation (needed when cars and heating would become electrified) without burning carbons or nuclear. Not even if you cover all available space on earth in solar and put up millions of fans.
That statement is just plain wrong and clearly not based on any actual information.

The biggest renewable electricty generator in Australia is repalcing coal fired assets with renewables. The projects are paid for in full, with no government subsidies. The comapny generates more electricity from renewable sources than it does it fossil fuelled plants and has done so for many years. As the fossil fuel assets reach end of life they are being decomissioned and replaced with renewable generation.

They are the second biggest generator in Australia (close behind the largest).
 
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Rusty

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That statement is just plain wrong and clearly not based on any actual information.
Read his whole post ... especially the bit "needed when cars and heating would become electrified".
If every home and car in Australia was electric most people would be walking as they would not be able to charge their vehicles. That is due to a lack of 'overhead in capacity' and is something virtually every country in the world would run into. Most of us would be freezing our asses off as well as we don't have the moderate climate most of Australia does. Interestingly, even in Australia today there are 'shortages' when the temperature runs into the 30's and air conditioners are fired up everywhere.

** Info based on a trade magazine I was reading several weeks ago while taking a lunch break working at a NZ power station.
 
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Tooks

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Read his whole post ... especially the bit "needed when cars and heating would become electrified".
If every home and car in Australia was electric most people would be walking as they would not be able to charge their vehicles. That is due to a lack of 'overhead in capacity' and is something virtually every country in the world would run into. Most of us would be freezing our asses off as well as we don't have the moderate climate most of Australia does. Interestingly, even in Australia today there are 'shortages' when the temperature runs into the 30's and air conditioners are fired up everywhere.

** Info based on a trade magazine I was reading several weeks ago while taking a lunch break working at a NZ power station.
Here in the UK, the most demand we ever had for electricity was back in 2002, and since then it has dropped by 15%.

The UK isn’t unique in that.

Fossil energy, particularly for road fuels, uses large amounts of electricity too, so as we wean ourselves off those more electricity is available, even before we build new capacity.

Can we also stop using the logical fallacy of ‘if everybody had an electric car and electric home heating’ argument as well? It isn’t going to happen overnight, in the same way nobody worried about whether there’d be enough oil drilling, refining or petrol station capacity when the first ICE cars came out.

We obviously can manage a global move to renewable electricity, and create a lot of good jobs in the process.

It’s such a defeatist attitude to suggest otherwise.
 

Darren

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You can check how much renewable energy is being utilised for electricity generation in the UK national grid here.
I've seen this as high as 80% and as low as 5%. The 10% from nuclear is constant as nuclear stations are not easy to stop and start. The average for the last year was 26% renewable.
This is renewables in electricity generation which is approx 30% of the UK energy consumption. The rest is transport, industry and agriculture which is over 90% from fossil fuels.
So we have 26% of 30% of all energy from renewables - so very roughly 7% from all the wind farms, solar panels and other renewables.
Extrapolating that we would need 14 times more solar and wind farms to cover all of our needs from renewables which is both unlikely and not planned.
The UK Net Zero 2050 plan includes several assumptions about things like CCSR (carbon capture storage and reuse), a reduction in meat production and consumption and other efficiency measure and carbons sequestration.
 
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Tooks

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You can check how much renewable energy is being utilised for electricity generation in the UK national grid here.
I've seen this as high as 80% and as low as 5%. The 10% from nuclear is constant as nuclear stations are not easy to stop and start. The average for the last year was 26% renewable.
This is renewables in electricity generation which is approx 30% of the UK energy consumption. The rest is transport, industry and agriculture which is over 90% from fossil fuels.
So we have 26% of 30% of all energy from renewables - so very roughly 7% from all the wind farms, solar panels and other renewables.
Extrapolating that we would need 14 times more solar and wind farms to cover all of our needs from renewables which is both unlikely and not planned.
The UK Net Zero 2050 plan includes several assumptions about things like CCSR (carbon capture storage and reuse), a reduction in meat production and consumption and other efficiency measure and carbons sequestration.
It’s a good site that, and if you put the renewables aspect aside, explodes the myth that ‘there won’t be enough electricity to charge EVs if everybody had one’, clearly there would be if we build more capacity and/or move from road fuel refining electricity demand, at circa 4 kWh per litre.

There are some challenges to overcome with regards to electricity generation, but that’s still the case whether everybody embraces EVs or not, which as I’ve said will not solve the problem, but they certainly shouldn’t make it worse.
 

>moto<

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Read his whole post ... especially the bit "needed when cars and heating would become electrified".
If every home and car in Australia was electric most people would be walking as they would not be able to charge their vehicles. That is due to a lack of 'overhead in capacity' and is something virtually every country in the world would run into. Most of us would be freezing our asses off as well as we don't have the moderate climate most of Australia does. Interestingly, even in Australia today there are 'shortages' when the temperature runs into the 30's and air conditioners are fired up everywhere.

** Info based on a trade magazine I was reading several weeks ago while taking a lunch break working at a NZ power station.
That's catering for a short term unexpected demand (yes a hot day is considered unexpected). Knowing the demand for electricity is a different thing. There are power plants called 'peakers' whose only goal is to be started quickly in times of need. If they don't start quick enough, power is lost and the retailers start a process called 'curtailment' which effectively reduces electricity supply to the largest business consumers and redirects to it to homes. The genration is there, it's just not used when not needed.

Point is, this wouldn't happen overnight. People would typically charge their cars at night when electricty is cheapest, the electricity consumption is the lowest and the current infrastucture would be capable of supplying most, if not all of the demand. Add to that the massive reduction is electricty consumed by refining and other costs asscoiated with fossil fuels and you will see it's not that big an issue.
 
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