Review Asgard Access Plus 29er Bike Shed


SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
Product Image:
Asgard Review Thumbnail.jpg

1581524542099.png

1581524604592.png

1581524918162.png


Product name: Asgard Access Plus 29er Bike Shed
Price paid: £550
Score (out of 10): 8

Review: Summary

+ Much more secure than a garden shed
+ More likely to be insurance-friendly
+ Big enough for 3-4 modern mountain bikes and kit
+ Lid and doors give plenty of access space
+ Choice of colour and accessories

- Self build is not an easy option, and install service significantly increases the cost.
- No built-in anchor point
- Premium product at a premium price - Does it pay off for your bike collection?

Video

Too busy to read? Here's the video review!

Introduction

Bike theft is a constant threat in the city I live in. Sad, angry residents are pictured stood in front of their shattered garden sheds; details of stolen bikes are circulated by the neighbourhood watch; and I fear for the well being of my bikes and my family’s bikes...

Where should I store my bikes? Normal garden sheds use cheap locks, thin wooden walls, hinges and screws that are easily removed...

There must be a better shed.

After a bit of Googling, one product kept coming up. The UK made Asgard bike shed. Available in a range of sizes, I’m looking at the Access Plus, also known as the 29er, which claims to be designed to safely house four large modern bikes.

Is it secure?
Can it really holder four slack 29er mountain bikes?
And is it worth the money?

This is my long-term review, after 6 months of use.

Is it Secure?

What you need is something that deters theft, but also that your insurance company thinks is good enough to actually pay out on in the event of a theft.

Your storage should hide its contents and look more secure than an alternative target. With the Asgard, there’s no way to see what’s inside, unlike a typical shed with a window. And there’s no doubt the Asgard looks a lot less like an easy target.

Building the shed myself, I kept spotting clever design features for security and strength. Every part of the Asgard construction has some feature that also contributes to its security. I was really impressed.

Just picking a few examples here...

1. There's no bolts or screws that can be undone or cut externally. Unlike a normal shed.

2. The locks you can buy from Asgard are pretty normal kind-of okay locks, not super secure. But once in place, the locks are protected by the shed itself. You can’t get bolt croppers to them. I thought this design might make them hard to unlock and lock. But no! It’s super easy.

1581524918162.png


3. Every joint, every join, every place you could in theory get a crowbar in, has some sort of shield or reinforcement. I could imagine it taking a very noisy ten minutes with heavy duty tools just to prise open one part of the Asgard, and it still wouldn’t be enough space to pull a bike out. Impressive.

Okay, what about security features to keep your insurance company happy?

It’s locked, and the bikes inside are not visible to passers by. Both typically requirements of insurers. But insurers will often require that the bikes are also locked to an immovable object.

And this leads me to my one big wish for the Asgard. A built-in anchor point. Yes, I can throw a gold rated chain around all the bikes, but it would be so nice if there was somewhere to secure it to the inside. Asgard provides advice on fitting a third-party ground anchor, drilling through the base of the shed in to the concrete base. But for all the clever and secure construction of the Asgard I was left asking: Why couldn’t they have the option of a built-in anchor point?

So is it more secure than an alternative target? Yes.
Will it satisfy your insurance company? Yes, it will meet most insurer’s requirements for a secure outbuilding. But check your policy - you may still be expected to lock you bikes up *inside* the Asgard.

Is it Really Big Enough?

The next question to ask is, is it big enough for all your bikes?

So many things today still seem to have been designed for bikes from the 90s - Bikes with smaller wheels, shorter frames, no cargo bikes, no ebikes.

The good news is, the Asgard Access Plus is super-big, and easy to use too.

My slack XL-sized 27.5+ hardtail, and a 29er ebike, and a long tail cargo bike, all fit.
Height is fine, although due to the slant of the roof, you sometimes need to turn the handlebars of the bikes.
Getting stuff in and out is simple through the two large opening doors, and roof, which has a good action.

Once full of bikes, there’s still plenty space in the corners for kit.

1581524542099.png


The Access Plus is advertised as holding four bikes. I’ve been using it for three, just because our bikes are used a lot, and shuffling four bikes around would be a bit much. With three bikes, there’s less faffing trying to get them in just-so.

I could certainly throw in my kid’s bike in addition to the three adult bikes, no problem.

Is it Worth the Money?


Let’s talk about the cost.

At time of writing, the Asgard Access Plus is listed at £550 including VAT. That also includes free delivery.
The optional installation service is an extra £225.

That’s more than double what I recently paid for a large garden shed to be delivered and built.

Is it worth it? Clearly, the security features of the Asgard are far better than a common wooden shed. I can see what I’m paying the extra for.

I do subscribe to the 10% rule of thumb: That you should expect to spend at least 10% of your bikes’ value on locks and security. I don’t have high-end bikes, but I do have a few nice bikes and ebikes. And a good track pump, work stand, and tools. All stuff I’d be worried about leaving in a garden shed.

There’s other benefits to the Asgard, such as its compact size, that may mean it’s a good choice for people who value the convenience of a dedicated bike shed, even without a fleet of expensive bikes to protect. It fits in to locations a typical shed would not, while still being able to house four bikes. That could save you money if you would otherwise have to get builders in to lay a new bases for a larger shed.

If I do the math, £550 is justifiable. I’m happy to invest in gold rated locks, and the Asgard provides a similar high level of security for a premium price.

How Easy is it to Build?

The build took me all afternoon. Easily four hours. It's not all a two-person job - you can get a lot done on your own with someone else available to help you for ten minutes occasionally.

It is hard work to build, and you need the right set of tools. If that’s a problem for you, Asgard offer a build service for an extra cost.

Conclusion

I’m going to put cost aside. If you are looking at an Asgard bike store, you have probably already decided the money is worth it to secure your bikes.

Which leaves the question, does it work as advertised? ...

It is much more secure than a wooden garden shed. But your insurance or your expensive bikes may demand additional locks and an anchor point inside.
In day to day use, it’s been a pleasure to use. Security can get in your way, but the ease of using the locks, the roof and side access, and ample space, mean I actually prefer it’s relative compact size compared to a typical 6x8 shed.

If you know you need to invest in good cycle storage and security, then the Asgard Access Plus delivers.

1581524604592.png
 

p3eps

E*POWAH Elite World Champion
Subscriber
Dec 14, 2019
766
323
Scotland
I bought one of these about 2 years ago. I keep a couple of bikes inside, and looked at keeping my wifes future bike and mates outside. I did the self build, and thought it was pretty straight forward. My mate and I put it together in a couple of hours. Wouldn't have fancied it on my own as it's pretty heavy. Mine had holes in the floor panel for fixing it to the patio it's sitting on - so it's bolted to the ground.

2 years later, it still doesn't have a bike in it... and my wife has filled it with a childs sandpit, a small chute and all of the outdoor seats cushions! We had another baby, and she still hasn't got a bike!
An expensive small storage box for the time being. It even has it's own alarm inside - which I never activate due to the low value of the contents!

High quality piece of kit though.
 

Fivetones

E*POWAH Elite World Champion
Patreon
Feb 11, 2019
918
373
Cheshire
Thanks for doing the review. I’ll be moving at some point and this helps with choosing a property when I might have to compromise on space etc.

I wonder if there are alternatives?
 
  • Like
Reactions: SquireRides

Waynetta

E*POWAH Elite
Subscriber
Feb 11, 2020
165
273
Plymouth Devon
Ride
Looking at a Levo SL
That looks a good investment! My garage needs clearing out,
3 mtbs, a road bike and a tandem taking up too much space 😳. When I buy my E bike two of the mtbs and my e bike would go in here a treat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SquireRides

p3eps

E*POWAH Elite World Champion
Subscriber
Dec 14, 2019
766
323
Scotland
Thanks for doing the review. I’ll be moving at some point and this helps with choosing a property when I might have to compromise on space etc.

I wonder if there are alternatives?
This was the other one I considered when buying.
Buy Protect A Cycle Secure Bike Storage Solution - Trimetals
I got the Asgard one with a 20% off voucher code - which is probably what swung it for me. It also matched my garden better than the green. I have a vague recollection that you could choose the Asgard colour?

I actually lied about having it for 2 years... I bought it in Jan 2016. I've had it for 4 years, and still never had a bike in it :ROFLMAO:
 

SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
For anyone who didn't watch the video, I should add that 2 weeks ago my garden shed was broken in to and two bikes were stolen. How? Because of all the reasons I list that the start of the review! They simply (and very tidily) unscrewed the 12 screws holding the locked door on. And then cut off the anchor that was screwed in to a joist.

I should have taken more measures to protect my shed (bolts replacing some of the screws; additional anchors; alarm), all tasks on my to-do list that I had not got around to doing.

Needless to say my garden shed is like Fort Knox now, even though it no longer contains any bikes (and wont in future).

The thieves didn't even try to get in to the Asgard shed right next to the garden shed. Bearing in mind they were clearly looking for bikes (and stole two more from a neighbour that night), and seeing as the Asgard is a bike shed, they didn't think it was worth attempting to get in to.

Asgard, rated 5-stars by thieving scumbags.
 

nickd164

Newbie
Jan 7, 2020
39
8
sheffield
Ride
non
After having my bikes stolen from a wooden shed three years ago I decided to buy one of these. I would say 3 bikes is a tight fit especially if you have the shelves at one end. I keep just two bikes in it, but if i go away I still take my main bike out and leave it in the house... it's probably safer in the shed. I think it's well worth the money and I managed to build it myself.
I also had a door put in the passage between the two terraces, together with the shed I'm hopefully confident they won't get knicked. It appears well made and sturdy.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shog46

mike425

Newbie
Jan 9, 2020
32
18
Sheffield
I had one of the bigger Asgard sheds at my old house, it was 8ft x 5ft I think.

I really rate them, also when I sold the house I sold the shed for £800 after paying £1200, so resale is good them.

Regarding a ground anchor, I actually cut a hole in the floor and cemented a ground anchor into the ground to chain bikes to.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nickd164

Rob Rides EMTB

Administrator
Staff member
Subscriber
Jan 14, 2018
3,606
663
Surrey, UK
Ride
Levo Expert
  • Like
Reactions: Fivetones

SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
I notice that there’s an ebike version now (same store but predrilled for electric point fitting by the looks of it.)

Access E Plus Bike Storage | Approved E-Bike Storage from Asgard
Yes, exactly the same in every way as the reviewed Access Plus, but with a port to run in a power cable, and a built in bracket to mount a socket to.

I did not think I’d need it. Always take the battery off and charge indoors... Until I ordered the Levo SL....
 
  • Like
Reactions: Fivetones

SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
I have this version. It's perfect for ebikes with the ability to charge them inside. I run a small heater in it too to keep the bikes batteries from getting too cold!
Heating is an interesting idea. Being metal, these sheds get cold. Over winter, If I put a wet bike in it comes out just as wet the next day, like still covered in water.

Again, thinking about how some eebs are sensitive to water ingress [EDIT - not ‘egress’, that would be an awesome feature] , I was considering either a heater of some sort that runs at a very low temp, or some of those passive de-humidifier packs.

Suggestions welcome.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rob Rides EMTB

Rob Rides EMTB

Administrator
Staff member
Subscriber
Jan 14, 2018
3,606
663
Surrey, UK
Ride
Levo Expert
Heating is an interesting idea. Being metal, these sheds get cold. Over winter, If I put a wet bike in it comes out just as wet the next day, like still covered in water.

Again, thinking about how some eebs are sensitive to water egress, I was considering either a heater of some sort that runs at a very low temp, or some of those passive de-humidifier packs.

Suggestions welcome.
I run a 2ft version of this:


Its just enough to take the chill out of the shed 👍🏻
 
  • Like
Reactions: SquireRides

mike425

Newbie
Jan 9, 2020
32
18
Sheffield
Heating is an interesting idea. Being metal, these sheds get cold. Over winter, If I put a wet bike in it comes out just as wet the next day, like still covered in water.

Again, thinking about how some eebs are sensitive to water ingress [EDIT - not ‘egress’, that would be an awesome feature] , I was considering either a heater of some sort that runs at a very low temp, or some of those passive de-humidifier packs.

Suggestions welcome.
I have seen a video somewhere of a guy using one of these to store motorbikes who literally glued foil backed insulation sheets to the walls, he was claiming it cured that issue.
 

Supratad

Member
Nov 13, 2019
261
93
North Yorkshire, UK
Ride
Spec Turbo Levo FSR
A couple of motorbike ground anchors as mentioned, that bolt through to concrete, or screw into earth below would have a the dual effect of securing bikes inside the box and making the box difficult to lift as a whole.
 

S D

E*POWAH Elite
Subscriber
Mar 26, 2019
156
253
Shelley
Ride
Focus Jam2 9.6
Product Image: View attachment 25925
View attachment 25926
View attachment 25927
View attachment 25929

Product name: Asgard Access Plus 29er Bike Shed
Price paid: £550
Score (out of 10): 8

Review: Summary

+ Much more secure than a garden shed
+ More likely to be insurance-friendly
+ Big enough for 3-4 modern mountain bikes and kit
+ Lid and doors give plenty of access space
+ Choice of colour and accessories

- Self build is not an easy option, and install service significantly increases the cost.
- No built-in anchor point
- Premium product at a premium price - Does it pay off for your bike collection?

Video

Too busy to read? Here's the video review!

Introduction

Bike theft is a constant threat in the city I live in. Sad, angry residents are pictured stood in front of their shattered garden sheds; details of stolen bikes are circulated by the neighbourhood watch; and I fear for the well being of my bikes and my family’s bikes...

Where should I store my bikes? Normal garden sheds use cheap locks, thin wooden walls, hinges and screws that are easily removed...

There must be a better shed.

After a bit of Googling, one product kept coming up. The UK made Asgard bike shed. Available in a range of sizes, I’m looking at the Access Plus, also known as the 29er, which claims to be designed to safely house four large modern bikes.

Is it secure?
Can it really holder four slack 29er mountain bikes?
And is it worth the money?

This is my long-term review, after 6 months of use.

Is it Secure?

What you need is something that deters theft, but also that your insurance company thinks is good enough to actually pay out on in the event of a theft.

Your storage should hide its contents and look more secure than an alternative target. With the Asgard, there’s no way to see what’s inside, unlike a typical shed with a window. And there’s no doubt the Asgard looks a lot less like an easy target.

Building the shed myself, I kept spotting clever design features for security and strength. Every part of the Asgard construction has some feature that also contributes to its security. I was really impressed.

Just picking a few examples here...

1. There's no bolts or screws that can be undone or cut externally. Unlike a normal shed.

2. The locks you can buy from Asgard are pretty normal kind-of okay locks, not super secure. But once in place, the locks are protected by the shed itself. You can’t get bolt croppers to them. I thought this design might make them hard to unlock and lock. But no! It’s super easy.

View attachment 25929

3. Every joint, every join, every place you could in theory get a crowbar in, has some sort of shield or reinforcement. I could imagine it taking a very noisy ten minutes with heavy duty tools just to prise open one part of the Asgard, and it still wouldn’t be enough space to pull a bike out. Impressive.

Okay, what about security features to keep your insurance company happy?

It’s locked, and the bikes inside are not visible to passers by. Both typically requirements of insurers. But insurers will often require that the bikes are also locked to an immovable object.

And this leads me to my one big wish for the Asgard. A built-in anchor point. Yes, I can throw a gold rated chain around all the bikes, but it would be so nice if there was somewhere to secure it to the inside. Asgard provides advice on fitting a third-party ground anchor, drilling through the base of the shed in to the concrete base. But for all the clever and secure construction of the Asgard I was left asking: Why couldn’t they have the option of a built-in anchor point?

So is it more secure than an alternative target? Yes.
Will it satisfy your insurance company? Yes, it will meet most insurer’s requirements for a secure outbuilding. But check your policy - you may still be expected to lock you bikes up *inside* the Asgard.

Is it Really Big Enough?

The next question to ask is, is it big enough for all your bikes?

So many things today still seem to have been designed for bikes from the 90s - Bikes with smaller wheels, shorter frames, no cargo bikes, no ebikes.

The good news is, the Asgard Access Plus is super-big, and easy to use too.

My slack XL-sized 27.5+ hardtail, and a 29er ebike, and a long tail cargo bike, all fit.
Height is fine, although due to the slant of the roof, you sometimes need to turn the handlebars of the bikes.
Getting stuff in and out is simple through the two large opening doors, and roof, which has a good action.

Once full of bikes, there’s still plenty space in the corners for kit.

View attachment 25926

The Access Plus is advertised as holding four bikes. I’ve been using it for three, just because our bikes are used a lot, and shuffling four bikes around would be a bit much. With three bikes, there’s less faffing trying to get them in just-so.

I could certainly throw in my kid’s bike in addition to the three adult bikes, no problem.

Is it Worth the Money?

Let’s talk about the cost.

At time of writing, the Asgard Access Plus is listed at £550 including VAT. That also includes free delivery.
The optional installation service is an extra £225.

That’s more than double what I recently paid for a large garden shed to be delivered and built.

Is it worth it? Clearly, the security features of the Asgard are far better than a common wooden shed. I can see what I’m paying the extra for.

I do subscribe to the 10% rule of thumb: That you should expect to spend at least 10% of your bikes’ value on locks and security. I don’t have high-end bikes, but I do have a few nice bikes and ebikes. And a good track pump, work stand, and tools. All stuff I’d be worried about leaving in a garden shed.

There’s other benefits to the Asgard, such as its compact size, that may mean it’s a good choice for people who value the convenience of a dedicated bike shed, even without a fleet of expensive bikes to protect. It fits in to locations a typical shed would not, while still being able to house four bikes. That could save you money if you would otherwise have to get builders in to lay a new bases for a larger shed.

If I do the math, £550 is justifiable. I’m happy to invest in gold rated locks, and the Asgard provides a similar high level of security for a premium price.

How Easy is it to Build?

The build took me all afternoon. Easily four hours. It's not all a two-person job - you can get a lot done on your own with someone else available to help you for ten minutes occasionally.

It is hard work to build, and you need the right set of tools. If that’s a problem for you, Asgard offer a build service for an extra cost.

Conclusion

I’m going to put cost aside. If you are looking at an Asgard bike store, you have probably already decided the money is worth it to secure your bikes.

Which leaves the question, does it work as advertised? ...

It is much more secure than a wooden garden shed. But your insurance or your expensive bikes may demand additional locks and an anchor point inside.
In day to day use, it’s been a pleasure to use. Security can get in your way, but the ease of using the locks, the roof and side access, and ample space, mean I actually prefer it’s relative compact size compared to a typical 6x8 shed.

If you know you need to invest in good cycle storage and security, then the Asgard Access Plus delivers.

View attachment 25927
This is great timing as i was just about to pull the trigger on one of these.
Since mine will be going to the alps i have a couple of questions.
1- you mentioned that self build isnt easy , could you elaborate as this is what i will need to do.
2-Also how did you find the weight of the individual sections .?
it will be me and the missus putting it together so it weight could be an issue.
Thanks in advance
 

SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
This is great timing as i was just about to pull the trigger on one of these.
Since mine will be going to the alps i have a couple of questions.
1- you mentioned that self build isnt easy , could you elaborate as this is what i will need to do.
2-Also how did you find the weight of the individual sections .?
it will be me and the missus putting it together so it weight could be an issue.
Thanks in advance
In reverse order:

2. The lid is the only really heavy bit. Two person job to lift it up, then just about possible for one person to hold it while the other screws it on. I built the shed with my wife. Dont have to be super strong, just patient...

1. I actually cut a section from the review/video about building it. Took up too much time. Here's the notes, in full:

So, in addition to having a second person available to help, here’s my tips for building the Asgard Access Plus yourself.

Number 1, Use the right tools.
The metal panels screw together through pre-drilled holes. You definitely want a power drill. A decent one. My 12v battery drill was unable to drive the screws, but my 14v model did.
Also, because the screws require this much force, you need exactly the right driver. Not just any old Philips head, because you risk stripping the screw head. I had to try several bits before I found the right one. So, have a few available to try.

There are also a small number of screw holes that are very hard to reach. Having a magnetic manual screwdriver to get these started would make it much easier, before finishing off with the power drill.

Number 2, sliding on the side walls.

One of the trickiest parts is fitting the side walls. They kind of hook over a lip on the base. It's a tight fit - I found myself kicking the panels to get them properly engaged. But once engaged you then have to micro adjust the panel to line up the screw holes. I found this almost impossible. But, after applying some WD40 to the part of the base the side walls join to, it was much easier to both place and adjust the sidewalls. [Illustrate by pointing at the instructions]

It’s kinda hard to explain but you’ll know when you get to it. Just have some WD40 ready.

Finally, number 3, lubricate your locks. Again, a spray of WD40 in to the locks will ensure they unlock smoother from day one, and also makes them better prepared for life in the outdoors.
 

S D

E*POWAH Elite
Subscriber
Mar 26, 2019
156
253
Shelley
Ride
Focus Jam2 9.6
Thanks for the tips , I’ve not had chance to watch the video yet.
I’m definitely an expert when it comes to kicking and hammering stuff together for sure 😀
 

Beezerk

Active member
Mar 23, 2019
277
143
Gateshead
Hi mate, what did you use for the base to sit the box on? Looks like those interlocking things you'd use for a gravel driveway.
I'm just about the order the E-bike version and I'm wanting to get the floor sorted before it arrives.
 

SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
Hi mate, what did you use for the base to sit the box on? Looks like those interlocking things you'd use for a gravel driveway.
I'm just about the order the E-bike version and I'm wanting to get the floor sorted before it arrives.
They are a bit like those grave drive way things but they are specifically designed for creating bases for shed and things.

There's various brands out there. I used ProBase. Most garden or shed websites sell them.

Happy with the product but TBH it's probably easier to get a level surface with concrete if you're happy doing it yourself. I know I'll be moving the Asgard in a couple of years (once my daughter has outgrown the play house that sits on my other concrete base!) so these bases are obviously much easier to remove than a slab. And once covered by gravel, they look very neat too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beezerk

p3eps

E*POWAH Elite World Champion
Subscriber
Dec 14, 2019
766
323
Scotland
I had an unused space in my garden next to my patio. I had a guy cement some large heavy duty slabs in place to create a base.
I then used some of those concrete anchors to fix the Asguard to the slabs. Certainly wouldn't be shifting that in a hurry!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beezerk

SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
Nice one, thanks mate.
Just one last question, did you bother with the additional wooden base you can buy for it?
No. It doesn't add anything IMHO. If it was a big shed you walked around in then a wooden floor would be nice as it would dampen your steps. But hauling bikes in and out of this shed, I honestly cant see a wooden floor making any difference....

It may also make installing a ground anchor harder.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beezerk

Fat Rat

Member
May 7, 2020
73
78
UK
Ride
Scott /Haibike
Ive got one of these bike sheds to
ive had it since mid 2017 and its been faultless
very secure and no rust any where
really nice bit of kit for the bikes
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beezerk

MrSimmo

Newbie
Apr 24, 2020
230
43
UK
Update - mine came on Monday. Looks great, easy to build, quite robust. Have the e-bike version which is basically the 29er shed with a mounting point for a plug socket and a pre-drilled hole for the power cable.

The right hand door is secured at the bottom using a rod that goes top to bottom, not sure how secure that is if someone uses a pry-bar on the bottom rather than a multipoint system. It makes a racket though when you open it so Im sure the neighbours would hear anyone trying to get in!

One thing I would have liked is a code lock rather than keys, I emailed them but they dont have any plans for that unfortunately (at least in built, i'm sure one could buy a padlock which may do that).

Mine is anchored to the concrete beneath (pre drilled holes) and I also have a ground anchor which I drilled through the metal base into the concrete. The metal structure is strengthened so needs special cutting tools/drill-pieces to get through and makes a hell of a noise so anyone trying to break in couldn't do it silently unless they pick the padlocks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beezerk

SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
The metal structure is strengthened so needs special cutting tools/drill-pieces to get through
I fitted an extra anchor point a couple of weeks ago. Broke my small drill bit i was using for a pilot hole! The 8mm bit got through fine (with a lot of noise!). So, yeah, don't use small, delicate drill bits on it!
 

Beezerk

Active member
Mar 23, 2019
277
143
Gateshead
Nice one mate, so just to confirm the box has pre drilled holes in the bottom to anchor it to the floor? I thought I'd read it voids the warranty if you drill the bottom which was a bit puzzling as they recommend it is fixed to the floor :LOL:
 

SquireRides

E*POWAH BOSS
Subscriber
Sep 4, 2018
428
413
UK
Nice one mate, so just to confirm the box has pre drilled holes in the bottom to anchor it to the floor? I thought I'd read it voids the warranty if you drill the bottom which was a bit puzzling as they recommend it is fixed to the floor :LOL:
There's 4 holes in the corners of the shed base to secure the Asgard to the floor. If you want a ground anchor you have to drill additional holes. It comes with instructions/advice for how to do this. It's all obvious, but i think they just want to point out that you need to treat the new holes for rush prevention (it's steel after all).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beezerk