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New Rockshox Zeb Fork

A look at the different options including the EMTB specific Zeb forks.

  1. From 150 to 180 on the same fork with a just a click turn? That’s a nice feature men two forks in one
  2. wondering if the adjustable fork will be a nice addition to the Decoy as you can master up the climbs better (common complaint for the Decoy) then blast down the backside. 180 seems to be the preferred travel down, then going to 150 will keep the front down a bit for the climbs. Decoy owners, thoughts?
  3. Not sure but I think it’s a business that make excellent suspension parts for mountain bikes (forks and shocks).

    My experience is that they spend a lot more time being repaired than Fox components – and I prefer to be riding.

  4. From 150 to 180 on the same fork with a just a click turn? That’s a nice feature men two forks in one

    Not really. It’s only for climbing but it can make a difference if you struggle with the front end lifting or losing steering. Fox used to make a TALAS* fork (may still do, I haven’t looked) that could swap from 140 to 110 at the flick of a lever (maybe also a 160-130). So it’s the same 30 mm adjustment option. It was handy at first and there were a few short and steep climbs where it helped, but I soon got the hang of climbing them without having to risk leaning down to move the lever. In the end I stopped using it. The downside of the TALAS system was that I could not tune the air spring by adding tokens or even by adding oil other than a very small amount that would have little effect. I wonder if the dual position Rockshox offering stop the addition of tokens?

    *(TALAS = Travel Adjust Linear Air System, I think)

  5. A look at the different options including the EMTB specific Zeb forks

    @Rob Hancill would love to hear how the Zeb compares to the boxxer on the Kenevo. You hinted in your video you would compare the two forks but I dont think you got to it in the end. Great video nonetheless, love your new studio and quality!

  6. If you’re bike came with 150mm of travel won’t 180mm forks impact the handling? How does that work?
  7. If you’re bike came with 150mm of travel won’t 180mm forks impact the handling? How does that work?

    Its really designed to be the other way round, they are a 180mm fork that can be dropped to 150mm when climbing, so designed for a bigger travel bike.

  8. I’ll definitely buy an entry level 160mm ZEB to upgrade my 150mm Yari on the Decoy. I was going to get a £40 160mm new style Debonair spring anyway :)
    I just need the price to be down to around £600 from £679 RRP. If I can sell the Yari for £250/£300 then that’s a cheap upgrade as I have "saved" £1,000 by not going for the £5k Decoy with the 36, although that would have bought other bits too of course…
  9. What is a floating axle and y should I care?

    If your hub is say 109mm not 110mm, then tightening down the axle would pull the ends of the fork together and as you go into the travel the stantions would also have to bend or at least fight against slightly misaligned bushings. Is it really an issue? is guess no for most hubs and most peoples level of sensitivity, not to mention most people wont bolt it up following the correct procedure anyway and actually make the fork worse. I think also there must be an element of fork stiffness to the design, doing up the pinch bolt may reduce twisting of the lowers better than a loose axle hole and relying on the axle being given the correct preload by the user.

    FYI, the first 26" pikes had a floating axle design, the 20mm axle had a shoulder which tightened against the hub, then when you flicked the lever it used an expanding wedge to hold the axle in place and also prevent the right hand fork leg floating on the axle. Few people used those right, always yanking on the fork leg to close the QR, which mean the fork leg was not in its natural position and would bind through the travel. You couldnt really tell though as those were 32mm stantions back then.

  10. RS torque caps are their "solution" to the same issue of stiffening up the fork at the bottom. Have to say I installed them after going to a 223mm front rotor asn they definitely made a difference, as the bigger rotor really excavates the forces down there.
  11. No torque caps are end caps for the wheel hub that have a larger surface area, meaning “in theory” the connection between the hub, axle and fork is stronger, stiffer and flex less. They have nothing to do with axle size.
  12. No torque caps are end caps for the wheel hub that have a larger surface area, meaning “in theory” the connection between the hub, axle and fork is stronger, stiffer and flex less. They have nothing to do with axle size.

    gotcha. but the torque is still transmitted through the wheel hub to the tire. Imagine if the dropouts were the size of a brake rotor- that would not make the fork stiffer. To spread out the stress of the hub, you need a larger dropout AND a larger hub so the CONTACT AREA is greater. no?

  13. yes, the torque caps make the contact area greater – whether they work or not is another topic all together
  14. What is a floating axle and y should I care?

    Like others have explained – better thought through than how I would’ve put it – it’s smoother :)

    Fox:

    SMOOTHER
    36 & 38 Floating Axle
    FLOATING AXLE
    Floating axles might look similar to other axles, but in fact they offer a distinct performance advantage due to their unique ability to match the exact width of the fork’s wheel mounting surface precisely to the front hub flange spacing, thus creating perfect chassis alignment and eliminating unwanted friction between the upper and lower fork legs. Floating axles provide much smoother suspension movement throughout the entire range of the fork’s travel, notably improving sensitivity and overall ride quality.

    The all-new 36 and 38 come equipped with a new quick-release lever operated patent-pending floating axle system, combining the benefit of a floating axle with the ease of a tool-free quick-release. With this system, spacing is locked in via a floating sleeve, allowing repeated front wheel removal and reinstallation while maintaining perfect fork alignment. Floating sleeve positioning comes preset from the factory so if you are unsure of how to operate the floating axle system or simply don’t want to bother with it, you can just install the front wheel and get on with your ride.

    Available optionally is the new Kabolt-X, a lightweight bolt-on floating axle exclusively for the all-new 36 and 38 that not only shaves grams but also increases torsional stiffness via its sleeveless, single-sided pinch bolt design. Chassis alignment must be reset each time the front wheel is removed and reinstalled on both the Kabolt-X and 40 floating axles, but the end result is the same – perfect alignment and perfect performance.

  15. My fork says it is "torque cap compatible".

    If I became convinced that they would be an ugrade, how do I decide what torque caps to buy? Is it the fork that influences it, the hub, or the axle?

    I have a Rockshox fork, RaceFace AR30 hub, and a Novatec axle

  16. You need the hub manufacturer to have made torque caps for that hub. DT Swiss, Hope and of course SRAM do, but perhaps others ?
  17. My experience is that they spend a lot more time being repaired than Fox components – and I prefer to be riding.

    My experience is quite literally the opposite. I am on my 9th one in 25 years and they’ve been bombproof, even the first one, a Judy SL. Had a few Fox too and they were great if a little fragile.

  18. People here are saying that two week old Fox 38’s are already creaking from crown interface. Wonder if Zeb is better in this aspect…
  19. People here are saying that two week old Fox 38’s are already creaking from crown interface. Wonder if Zeb is better in this aspect…

    Most fox will have creaky crowns over time , it’s just the way they’re made . Just have to live with it ! Never had a creaky crowned RS !

  20. My experience is quite literally the opposite. I am on my 9th one in 25 years and they’ve been bombproof, even the first one, a Judy SL. Had a few Fox too and they were great if a little fragile.

    Fascinating. And RS shocks were even worse than theie forks for me. Super Deluxe, Monarchs were garbage. I actually won’t buy a bike with a RockShox shock on it. My fork experience has been mixed. I had an original Lyrik on my V1 Nomad that was quite bombproof. Rebas, Blutos, and Pikes were the opposite. Stuck down, inconsistent performance, frequent rebuilds needed. They came spec’d on the bikes I bought, and after a couple rebuilds I gave up and swapped them out for Fox 34’s and 36’s. Glad that you’ve had a better experience.

  21. Added the ZEB today replacing my Lyrik. We’ll see how she rides on my Decoy, but it looks very nice and honestly for the price of $799 US, it’s a nice deal. I did get the Select 170. Like the riding positon over the 160. My gosh, does 10mm of height make a difference? Well not much, but this fork does seem to hold it’s position better off the top. Will report back, and we’ll see. Excited about this update.
  22. I’t looks like the stanchions are spread wider apart than a lyric/yari? I wonder if we’ll see a 38mm stanchion boxxer with more space between stanchions? That wouldn’t restrict the turning radius on emtb’s as they do currently because of fatter downtubes
  23. Was considering the dual postion fork, but just don’t think I’m ready to begin adjusting the travel 6-10 times during a ride, plus it’s not going to have the opportunity to add the ultimate damper if I want down the road if I’m thinking correctly. It’s a great idea, but smashing down the trails then catching a quick steep uphill for a bit will have me stopping or adjusting on the fly while rolling? Fox did this with the Tallus (sp?) fork years ago but it never seemed to fully catch on. It’s the very reason most don’t reach down to adjust the firmness setting on their rear or front shock. It’s a pain, and if your moving faster, it’s a distraction. Thoughts?
  24. After ride update:

    I put 11KM in bright and early this morning.
    I rode Expresso / Lower Expresso / Lower Digger X2.

    I’m 205lbs with gear
    I have sag set to around 27%
    1 Token
    No Torque Caps (I still need to get in touch with Industry 9).

    I pushed it a little on the climb and dropped right into the first decent.
    I was definitely sloppy with line choice and placing the front tire.
    The fork felt really supportive and didn’t dive in the corners.
    The first noticeable difference was in the steep rock roll down the back face of a boulder.

    View attachment 35623

    At the bottom of this, there is a decent right hand turn. I got super squirly but pushed out of it without washing out and getting right stuffed into the woods.
    The rest of Expresso and the lower continuation has a lot of berms, roots and rocks trying to keep you honest and some jumps.
    ZEB is a killer fork.
    I plowed my way down the hill, launching on top of rocks and root…mostly because I’m shitastic at looking at where I should go (place my tire), instead I seem to be looking at all the baby heads and wooden middle fingers littered on the ground.

    The fork is way more plush and supple than the Lyrik Select (Duh!)
    I’m really happy with putting down the extra cash, instead of just upgrading the air spring and damper to Ultimate status.

    Bottom Line:
    I’m heavy, not smooth and plow like I’m back home on the prairies of Alberta. (In another life)
    This fork saved my ass numerous times today and with some tweaking to the air volume and rebound – I’m looking forward to it saving my ass many many more times.

    Let me know if you have any questions.
    Happy to reply with my thoughts.
    -Kinger

    View attachment 35625

    [Before it got all dirty today]

  25. ….and it’s double pain when you forget to extend them after the climb !

    In early 2014, I went to the Welsh mtb trail Antur Stiniog on my Norco Sight with its TALAS system. Big mistaaake! Antur Stiniog is designed for DH mtbs not lightweight trail bikes. Think Bike Park Wales on steroids.

    In fact I made two mistakes that day.
    The previous day I had ridden another trail, standard Welsh red trail (I can no longer remember which it was). It had ended with a long and steep climb on a fire road back to the car. I had left the bike with the fork set to Climb (it was Fox CTD fork) and with the TALAS set to 110 mm travel instead of 140 mm. I was a bit hungover from the night before and I failed to check the bike before setting off down one of the blue trails. The standard advice given at reception was that if this was your first ride, knock one level off your usual trail grade. Thank God!

    OMG, I was banged about good and proper from the fork set on Climb (ie Firm), not just the rough trail. But the absolute worst bit was descending down steep and rough trails on a fork that was set 30 mm lower than the back end. For most of the ride on that first trail I felt as though I was about to go OTB at every obstacle. I almost puked my guts at the end of the ride (hangover, not fear!) Totally sobered by the first ride, I checked the bike and discovered my mistakes. After a refreshing break at the Cafe, I did the blue again. Totally different ride I’m pleased to report, but I did not venture on to one of the reds. One of my mates was a very similar standard rider to me and he had borrowed a DH bike. After riding one of the reds he advised me not to try it on my Norco, as it had scared the crap out of him. He joined me on the blues.

  26. After ride update:

    I put 11KM in bright and early this morning.
    I rode Expresso / Lower Expresso / Lower Digger X2.

    I’m 205lbs with gear
    I have sag set to around 27%
    1 Token
    No Torque Caps (I still need to get in touch with Industry 9).

    I pushed it a little on the climb and dropped right into the first decent.
    I was definitely sloppy with line choice and placing the front tire.
    The fork felt really supportive and didn’t dive in the corners.
    The first noticeable difference was in the steep rock roll down the back face of a boulder.

    View attachment 35623

    At the bottom of this, there is a decent right hand turn. I got super squirly but pushed out of it without washing out and getting right stuffed into the woods.
    The rest of Expresso and the lower continuation has a lot of berms, roots and rocks trying to keep you honest and some jumps.
    ZEB is a killer fork.
    I plowed my way down the hill, launching on top of rocks and root…mostly because I’m shitastic at looking at where I should go (place my tire), instead I seem to be looking at all the baby heads and wooden middle fingers littered on the ground.

    The fork is way more plush and supple than the Lyrik Select (Duh!)
    I’m really happy with putting down the extra cash, instead of just upgrading the air spring and damper to Ultimate status.

    Bottom Line:
    I’m heavy, not smooth and plow like I’m back home on the prairies of Alberta. (In another life)
    This fork saved my ass numerous times today and with some tweaking to the air volume and rebound – I’m looking forward to it saving my ass many many more times.

    Let me know if you have any questions.
    Happy to reply with my thoughts.
    -Kinger

    View attachment 35625

    [Before it got all dirty today]

    Classic! Safe to say we can cross off "fork dive" on the possible concern list. Bike is looking tight doood

  27. Took my first ride on the Zeb Select and totally concur with Kinger. This fork is a game changer, and my, are they going to convert many off the Lyrik into this sweet ride especially at this price point. Not to get me wrong, the Lyrik for enduro bikes all day, but for only .5lb weight penalty, I could see this on my sb130 vs the Fox 36 160mm., this fork is just that sweet! This thing rocks, enough said.
  28. I’m in for buying the zeb select 180mm 27.5 for the 2020 kenevo comp but am unsure which offset 38 or 44 ? Bike has a 42mm atm !
  29. Does anyone understand the differences between the Charger R and charger RC dampers? I don’t need the low speed adjustments of the cheaper select but it’s only £50 more than the fixed travel base model on Bikeinn so I don’t want to miss out on a better damper in case there are other differences.
  30. Does anyone understand the differences between the Charger R and charger RC dampers? I don’t need the low speed adjustments of the cheaper select but it’s only £50 more than the fixed travel base model on Bikeinn so I don’t want to miss out on a better damper in case there are other differences.

    The "c" is for compression adjustment. Quite useful i think

  31. I put over 150km in on the ZEB Ultimate last week.
    Jump, flow, rowdy, steep, you name it.
    So impressed.

    It’s the first time I’ve tried the charger 2.1 damper.
    I highly recommend going for the ultimate – or getting the upgrade down the road.

    So supple and plush.
    Huge difference from the charger RC or previous damper iteration.
    Also I can’t believe how little air pressure I can run without getting bottom, while still utilizing full, and I mean FULL travel.

    I’ll be putting torque caps on tomorrow, not sure I’ll notice anything different though.
    I’ll be in touch.

    -Kinger

  32. Was considering the dual postion fork, but just don’t think I’m ready to begin adjusting the travel 6-10 times during a ride, plus it’s not going to have the opportunity to add the ultimate damper if I want down the road if I’m thinking correctly. It’s a great idea, but smashing down the trails then catching a quick steep uphill for a bit will have me stopping or adjusting on the fly while rolling? Fox did this with the Tallus (sp?) fork years ago but it never seemed to fully catch on. It’s the very reason most don’t reach down to adjust the firmness setting on their rear or front shock. It’s a pain, and if your moving faster, it’s a distraction. Thoughts?

    I’ll take a premium damper over farting around with the travel any day.

  33. As a lanky XL guy living in the alps, i always had a problem with my front tire lifting in steep climbs.
    I used U-turn, Talas, Dual Position air.
    This latest one was the best. Tokens could be use, but you had to be careful as their effect was greater than on fixed position forks.
    Only difference with a fixed travel fork, is that they needed a little more pressure, and so there was a tad more friction at the seals.
    edit : watching the 2021 doc online, they recommand 10PSI more for DP forks at the same travel, so looks the same

    The problem was that theses forks used a special casting, with a little hole to have the air flow from the positive to the negative chamber to get both filed. So it was not possible to take a fixed travel fork, and just put a dual position air cartridge inside to transform it.

    Do you guys know if it’s still the case with this latest generation ? Are the lowers specific to the dual position version ?

  34. The "c" is for compression adjustment. Quite useful i think

    Cheers. So R and RC are the same damper but without the compression damping adjustment on the R? I have never used it on my acoustic bikes so I probably won’t need it on the e-bike.

  35. 1st ride on my zeb select 180’s at rogate yesterday and set them at 25% with 1token . Rode mega smooth but bottom out a few times so increases sag to 20% , nice but still bottomed so will add another token ! Felt nice and solid in the corners and choppy stuff until I hit a wet newly exposed root and was fattened ! Wrist/hand is done in hopefully nothing broke as morzine in 5weeks !
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