2019 to 2021 Turbo Levo Dropper cable


Binhill1

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2019
839
173
Scotland
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None
Any tips regarding changing dropper on Levo expert. Is the cable easy enough to get out and new one in.
 

thewildblue

Active member
Feb 14, 2019
131
113
Bucks
Ride
Trek LT7
Inner cable comes out nice and easy. Be careful with the outer if it drops too low you will have to drop the motor, which isnt as bad as it sounds. Cranks off, remove the front chain ring, pivot bolt and then the 6 motor bolts. Of course the battery needs to be out also.
 

Binhill1

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2019
839
173
Scotland
Ride
None
Inner cable comes out nice and easy. Be careful with the outer if it drops too low you will have to drop the motor, which isnt as bad as it sounds. Cranks off, remove the front chain ring, pivot bolt and then the 6 motor bolts. Of course the battery needs to be out also.
Changing from command post to one up so I can use same outer you think.
 

TrackRat

Member
May 26, 2020
60
98
SchnellerGT981
Ride
'19 Levo Expert
When do you need to replace the outer? Making a change to a Fox Transfer and wondering whether I need to worry about replacing the outer as opposed to just threading a new cable thru
 

DtEW

Member
Dec 8, 2020
206
53
Bay Area, California
Re: replacing the dropper post outer cable. There’s actually no need to drop the motor. All you need is to get the left motor cover off, which in-turn requires removing the left-side crank arm, as per the Specialized Rider Care video. Just with that, threading the cable on either side of the cable guide at the base of the seat tube is actually fairly easy.
 
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Binhill1

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2019
839
173
Scotland
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None
Re: replacing the dropper post outer cable. There’s actually no need to drop the motor. All you need is to get the left motor cover off, which in-turn requires removing the left-side crank arm, as per the Specialized Rider Care video. Just with that, threading the cable on either side of the cable guide at the base of the seat tube is actually fairly easy.
Yes found the video . Do I need to change outer as well any idea would be a length issue if anything I'm thinking. Thanks anyway
 

Binhill1

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2019
839
173
Scotland
Ride
None
Re: replacing the dropper post outer cable. There’s actually no need to drop the motor. All you need is to get the left motor cover off, which in-turn requires removing the left-side crank arm, as per the Specialized Rider Care video. Just with that, threading the cable on either side of the cable guide at the base of the seat tube is actually fairly easy.
Just watched video he inserts both ends of the cable from left side . My cable does not go through the shadow loop. I fitted new motor myself so messed up not putting bight in loop im thinking . That explains why outer cable has wear on it. Very gritty in there as well.
 

DtEW

Member
Dec 8, 2020
206
53
Bay Area, California
Just watched video he inserts both ends of the cable from left side . My cable does not go through the shadow loop. I fitted new motor myself so messed up not putting bight in loop im thinking . That explains why outer cable has wear on it. Very gritty in there as well.
Well, if you routed it wrong/direct, then you definitely need to re-size with new housing, since the correct/“shadow loop” routing requires approximately an entire foot more of housing/cable.

Yes, housing surface scuffing is one of the consequences of mis-routing the dropper cable, as it will be forced to make an acute turn over a sharp edge. Increased cable friction + accelerated liner wear (due to the too-acute turn) is another consequence. Deeper dropper insertion (i.e. setting up for shorter leg lengths) will also be a problem since the cable will be forced to do crazy things if you insert the post past where the “side-arm” joins the seat tube.
 

Binhill1

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2019
839
173
Scotland
Ride
None
Well, if you routed it wrong/direct, then you definitely need to re-size with new housing, since the correct/“shadow loop” routing requires approximately an entire foot more of housing/cable.

Yes, housing surface scuffing is one of the consequences of mis-routing the dropper cable, as it will be forced to make an acute turn over a sharp edge. Increased cable friction + accelerated liner wear (due to the too-acute turn) is another consequence. Deeper dropper insertion (i.e. setting up for shorter leg lengths) will also be a problem since the cable will be forced to do crazy things if you insert the post past where the “side-arm” joins the seat tube.
Yes I can see what you mean there would have been a bight of extra cable . Maybe even why it stopped returning back up when pressing lever the cable could be damaged. Have a better look the morn . It would have done 500 ish miles not being in the proper way. Not so easy to see with my old eyes. Still learning thanks.
 

TrackRat

Member
May 26, 2020
60
98
SchnellerGT981
Ride
'19 Levo Expert
Just did this today. Swapped my stock dropper (19 Levo Expert) for a Fox Transfer. Was somewhat of a PITA. Originally planned to reuse the original cable housing but accidentally pulled it too far down the seat post tube. Couldn’t retrieve it and just ended up yanking it out and starting over. Originally he tried to connect a new piece of housing to the original and just pull it thru but it kept getting snagged. Took off the left crack and engine cover and fed the new housing up from the bottom. Pretty easy to get the seat tube section done. Snaking it back up to the front of the bike was a pain as it took some finesse to get it to round the corner and up thru the tubing adjacent to the rear shock. On the done I was very happy. The process was frustrating as I hadn’t allocated enough time
 

Binhill1

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2019
839
173
Scotland
Ride
None
Just did this today. Swapped my stock dropper (19 Levo Expert) for a Fox Transfer. Was somewhat of a PITA. Originally planned to reuse the original cable housing but accidentally pulled it too far down the seat post tube. Couldn’t retrieve it and just ended up yanking it out and starting over. Originally he tried to connect a new piece of housing to the original and just pull it thru but it kept getting snagged. Took off the left crack and engine cover and fed the new housing up from the bottom. Pretty easy to get the seat tube section done. Snaking it back up to the front of the bike was a pain as it took some finesse to get it to round the corner and up thru the tubing adjacent to the rear shock. On the done I was very happy. The process was frustrating as I hadn’t allocated enough time
Have a look today struggling to see where it is supposed to insert when I looked yesterday. If I can get both ends through shadow loop I can attach to old cable to get to front as old one still in but not through loop.
 

Binhill1

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2019
839
173
Scotland
Ride
None
N
Have a look today struggling to see where it is supposed to insert when I looked yesterday. If I can get both ends through shadow loop I can attach to old cable to get to front as old one still in but not through loop.
Well that was a nightmare sorting that out . Can't see what you are doing and in the end one up remote is Shite to reach.