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All new 2020 Merida eONE-SIXTY

Merida have just announced their all new 2020 eONE-SIXTY. With a new carbon frame, mixed 29er and 27.5 wheels and an integrated battery, its quite a departure from the original, highly regarded trail whippet. The bike uses the all new Shimano BT-8035 internal battery, but the capacity remains the same at 504Wh.

The eONE-SIXTY has new, revised geometry and a slackened head angle at 65.5 degrees, changed the crank length to 165mm (from 175mm) and follows the on trend offering of many new Shimano powered bikes by providing a 29er on the front, with a 2.5″ Maxxis Assegai and a 27.5″ on the rear wrapped in a 2.6″ DHR2. The new

2020 Merida eONE-SIXTY Geometry

Merida claim that helps keep the chain stay as short as possible whilst offering as much grip as possible in the rear, whilst the 29er on the front helps with the rolling abilities for rocks, roots and chunkier stuff.

Moving to carbon meant that Merida had to work out a way of dissipating the heat generated from the battery. Carbon is not a great heat dissipator, so Merida have placed slots near the head tube to help keep the battery cool. Merida call this the Thermo Gate!

The eONE-SIXTY integrated battery has a dual locking mechanism. Firstly, the battery is held in place with a catch then it is secured with Allen bolts. The tool for this is neatly held in the rear axle. Merida claim that this not only protects the battery, but reduces the risk of battery noise and vibrations, as well as making it easy to remove, replace with a spare or just recharge without having to do so on the bike.

e-ONE-SIXTY uses the regarded Shimano E8000 motor, with up to 70 Nm of power. The bike also moves over to the neater E7000 mode shifter which means an under bar dropper can be used.

One of the strongest attributes of the original bike was its playful, agile but composed handling. Merida wanted to all of that into the new generation of bike. Lowering of the bottom bracket, slackening the head angle and the new mixed wheel sizes, Merida say, should help retain the lively character of the original bike.

eONE-SIXTY 9000, £7000

4 models will be available, but the UK will be taking 3 of them. Priced at £5850 for the 8000, £7000 for the 9000 and £9500 for the 10K, the bikes certainly are at the top end of the pricing for the category.

The eONE-SIXTY won’t be available until October 2019, which seems to be the case with a few other of the new Shimano BT-8035 equipped bikes (Propain EKANO is the same release time). So plenty of time to consider it as an option for your next EMTB.

For a closer look at the eONE-SIXTY 10K, check out Knut’s video below:

  1. Looks awesome! Addresses most of the concerns/upgrades made by the eONE-SIXTY guys on here. Agree re the battery. Shame it isn’t a bit higher capacity. Maybe Shimano will come up with a bigger capacity with same form factor. Looks really expensive though compared to the original. Waiting for prices in our part of the world. I want one! But maybe wait for a few more iterations. EMTB’s are just getting better and better. Awesome!
  2. I guess the days of Merida being a value option are over. Looks like they have taken a leaf out of Specialized’s book – problem is they don’t have the premium brand reputation to go with the £££. At those prices and with little to differentiate it from the premium completion it is now up against I’m not sure who will be buying this one tbh…
  3. Any word on the weight? With this, the Decoy, and bikes like the Propaine Ecano all I am really seeing is aesthetic improvements, I am still not convinced by internal batteries, especially when you need a tool to remove them.

    In real world situations the external battery system in use at the moment only takes 10 seconds to swap out, and keeps the weight low, and more importantly low in the frame and near the BB.

    Really its only the potential 700wh battery on the Decoy that would currently tempt me away from my Vitus with the current crop of new Shimano bikes being announced, especially as most of them dont seem to be any lighter either unless you are willing to pay near 10k.

    @Rob Hancill is right in that battery range will be the biggest deciding factor for me when looking at my next bike, provided of course the rest of the specs stack up

  4. I think companies are sinking a huge amount into R&D in their frame design etc, probably to maintain integrity in their carbon frame when a battery is moved to an internal design. That cost, as well as an increased cost from OEM’s is pushing up the bike prices.
  5. I think companies are sinking a huge amount into R&D in their frame design etc, probably to maintain integrity in their carbon frame when a battery is moved to an internal design. That cost, as well as an increased cost from OEM’s is pushing up the bike prices.

    All that, plus they can see Specialized have almost made it “normal” for buyers to believe they need to spend £7k to get a decently specced ebike.

  6. I also think that there is a market for these top end bikes – I see a lot of people round me on Experts and S-Works for example, who are not riding them aggressively but just doing North downs way etc, but want the top end kit.

    I think the issue for many brands may be that whilst Specialised have a brand recognition that means that many who are not that into MTB, or are not the kind of people to follow MTB media will be happy to pay top dollar for one, I can’t see that being the same with brands that are only really know amongst the "core community".

    The only other brands I have seen that people must have spent ££££££ on are BMC, seen a couple of their EMTB’s locally too.

    The only Pivot Shuttles, tope end Scott’s etc I have seen out in the wild in Surrey Hills have been those riden by sponsored riders.

  7. Merida were marketing this as a game changer, not sure I’m seeing that here, looks like they’re just bringing their range up to current trends, like YT Decoy. Except the Decoy isn’t £10k…ouch. TBH still using tried and tested motor battery combos, disappointing that the larger battery isn’t included. This means more built in obsolescence from the start. I think a lot of people may upgrade the battery later is or when it’s released. Bit more revenue generation. It’s a sexy bike, what they all seem to be doing is moving from sram to Shimano again, this has XTR brakes and mech. Not convinced by the charger port, that will fill with water and mud. I like the lil Allen key do-dad in the quick release, but Scott have been doing that for years. And spesh put a multi tool in the fork top cap. All that have done is play catch-up to the latest bikes like YT and Spesh. No real game changer. I’m also a bit sceptical of them lowering the BB, this just causes big pedal strikes. Still sticking with YT me thinks. But like I said…sexy bike though, nut not £10k sexy.
  8. The 5000 only has the e7000 motor, and the suspension fork is bargain basement too – having a laugh at that price
  9. Interesting that they will be selling the current 900 along side. 900 and 7000 not too far away in price.
  10. I also think that there is a market for these top end bikes – I see a lot of people round me on Experts and S-Works for example, who are not riding them aggressively but just doing North downs way etc, but want the top end kit.

    I think the issue for many brands may be that whilst Specialised have a brand recognition that means that many who are not that into MTB, or are not the kind of people to follow MTB media will be happy to pay top dollar for one, I can’t see that being the same with brands that are only really know amongst the "core community".

    The only other brands I have seen that people must have spent ££££££ on are BMC, seen a couple of their EMTB’s locally too.

    The only Pivot Shuttles, tope end Scott’s etc I have seen out in the wild in Surrey Hills have been those riden by sponsored riders.

    Completely agree. I suspect "…people round me on Experts and S-Works for example, who are not riding them aggressively but just doing North downs way etc, but want the top end kit" are commonly known as…

    hqdefault.jpg

    ;):ROFLMAO:

  11. Any word on the weight? With this, the Decoy, and bikes like the Propaine Ecano all I am really seeing is aesthetic improvements, I am still not convinced by internal batteries, especially when you need a tool to remove them.

    In real world situations the external battery system in use at the moment only takes 10 seconds to swap out, and keeps the weight low, and more importantly low in the frame and near the BB.

    Really its only the potential 700wh battery on the Decoy that would currently tempt me away from my Vitus with the current crop of new Shimano bikes being announced, especially as most of them dont seem to be any lighter either unless you are willing to pay near 10k.

    @Rob Hancill is right in that battery range will be the biggest deciding factor for me when looking at my next bike, provided of course the rest of the specs stack up

    Completely agree. No denying the new Merida looks like a great bike but if you’ve got an the older model it’s not really worth the upgrade (in my opinion), but the marketing and press hype suggests it’s a game changer.

    These integrated batteries seem to be adding a fair bit of cost and potential reliability issues. They seem more of a marketing stop gap until we get the next generation of motors and batteries.

    I just spent 4K on an eBike with Factory and XT components. Next time round it seems I’ll need another 2-3k…

  12. Completely agree. I suspect "…people round me on Experts and S-Works for example, who are not riding them aggressively but just doing North downs way etc, but want the top end kit" are commonly known as…

    hqdefault.jpg

    ;):ROFLMAO:

    I was trying not to offend any resident professional who may be on the forum😉

  13. Obviously the new eOne-Sixty looks great, and as an owner of the original, I’m happy that they’ve only needed to tweak the secret recipe to update it. However that’s quite a price to pay for an internal battery!
    It’s hardly lighter than the original, yet has a carbon front triangle?

    Having an internal battery seems like quite a price to pay for aesthetics:
    – Having to spend £1000s on Carbon to offset the weight and structural disadvantages of an integrated battery.
    – Cooling headaches.
    – Pain in the ass to remove the battery (as it’ll be covered in crud).

    I’ve long since wondered why the Kenevo is 2kg heavier than the Merida, given that the only significant weight difference in spec is a coil spring. I think it’s caused by wrapping an internal battery in aluminium, and cutting a battery slot which compromises the structure.

    This leads me to the conclusion that eBikes could be 1kg lighter if we weren’t so vain!

    Also, who the hell needs 12 speed on an eBike, and a range of 10-45 or 10-51? I think I’d manage just fine with 4 ratios on my eBike and save yet another 0.5kg! OK maybe I’m exaggerating a bit, but I copied Sam Pilgrim’s setup upgrading to an 11-36T 10 speed XT cassette. Not only is it a huge weight saving, but I can use a short cage Zee Mech, so the chain isn’t flapping around, plus the 36T ring is plenty to climb even the steepest of hills while towing my mate on his DH bike!

    Shame that many of the changes are driven by fashion rather than common sense.

    By the way, thanks for the video Rob!

  14. All that, plus they can see Specialized have almost made it “normal” for buyers to believe they need to spend £7k to get a decently specced ebike.

    This is a valid point and £7k with a 504Wh battery almost makes the Carbon Expert Levo look good VFM with it’s 700Wh battery. Almost.

  15. Nice looking bike but I’m more than happy with my 900e, it’s a great bike.
    The 10k will probably be around $16000 here in NZ.
    An extra $6000 for a fancy battery and a bit of carbon. I don’t think so.
    Hope the new bikes perform as good as they look to justify the huge price.
    E MTB magazine gave the 10k a great review.
    Maybe the 9000 would be the way to go price wise.
    They do look nice though 😘😘
  16. This bike looks absolutely amazing. Seen a embn Youtube video review of the bike, and seems amazing
    However it comes with a BIG price tag. Fully fitted, with extra battery, its 10K.
    I would never pay 10K for a bike. i mean honestly, i prefer buy a bike for the 3K and use the remaining 7K for a motorbike 😉
    Best of both worlds.
  17. Shows that beauty is in the eye of the beholder – to my eyes it’s blooming fuggly. :(

    Battery integration implementation seems worst of both worlds, price is silly, aesthetics are woeful compared to the Levo, carbon serves no advantage here, the drivetrain is over the top and battery size is so 2018… ;)

    If you want a Shimano motor and a similar spec I cannot see how this in any way betters the Vitus E Sommet at half the price?

  18. Quick update – Merida have been in touch to add to the feedback on the 504Wh battery in my video:

    " The decision to go with a 504Wh battery was a very deliberate one. The main reason is that the size of the battery has a big impact on the riding performance, and choosing a 504Wh size battery gives is the chance to optimise the low centre of gravity, for perfect corning. A high end electric sports car would follow the same principle and would focus on perfect handling and riding performance, rather than maximum reach.

    To give riders who are looking for extra-long distance performance, we offer the 10k model with a 2nd battery and an EVOC backpack (approx. retail value around €1,000) to easily take the 2nd battery for the extra-long outings. The new ENERGY GATE battery cover allows a super-fast and easy battery change, even out on the trail. And finally, by creating a battery opening for a 504Wh battery, allows us to keep the frame stiff as well lightweight. A bigger opening would require extra material to compensate for the loss of stiffness. "

  19. Quick update – Merida have been in touch to add to the feedback on the 504Wh battery in my video:

    " The decision to go with a 504Wh battery was a very deliberate one. The main reason is that the size of the battery has a big impact on the riding performance, and choosing a 504Wh size battery gives is the chance to optimise the low centre of gravity, for perfect corning. A high end electric sports car would follow the same principle and would focus on perfect handling and riding performance, rather than maximum reach.

    To give riders who are looking for extra-long distance performance, we offer the 10k model with a 2nd battery and an EVOC backpack (approx. retail value around €1,000) to easily take the 2nd battery for the extra-long outings. The new ENERGY GATE battery cover allows a super-fast and easy battery change, even out on the trail. And finally, by creating a battery opening for a 504Wh battery, allows us to keep the frame stiff as well lightweight. A bigger opening would require extra material to compensate for the loss of stiffness. "

    The reference to "a high end sports car" in Merida’s above response made me smile.

    I have such a vehicle on my drive.

    A BMW Z4 tin top convertible, 2.0 litres, 0 – 60 in six seconds, top speed of 140 mph, four years old and covered 16,000 miles.

    For sale for the same price as a Merida 10k.

    This is not an advert, just trying to put things in perspective. But then who ever said MTBs of any type were good value?

  20. Seems to be that Specialized is the only one who actually can make reasonable light bike with integrated battery. Maybe they have patented that structure where the battery slides from bottom and you can keep the down tube as a tube and because of that use reasonable wall thicknesses and so on..

    Like Merida said themselves in one of the articles "..an opening in the down tube for the integrated battery can reduce stiffness by up to 70% " and that is most likely true since that 10k model weight with the carbon frame and carbon wheels is still in the same rough level than almost half the price aluminum models from Canyon, Vitus, Commencal etc.. which use external battery.

    Expensive stuff this integration, but it is the trend at the moment. Just hard to justify twice the price compared to some other models with same motor and suspension components.. And I thought that new 2019 Levo´s were ridiculously expensive – they are starting to look like a bargain to me! :LOL:

  21. Can’t agree on the battery capacity being a problem though – this battery is small enough to fit a backpack. 500w is typically enough for the overwhelming majority of rides – then why would you be forced to carry the weight and bulk of a, say, 700w on all of such rides, knowing you’re not going to use it? You only add bulk when you feel you might need it – by carrying your second battery – giving you 1000w instead of the current max in-tube limit of 700.
  22. Seems to be that Specialized is the only one who actually can make reasonable light bike with integrated battery. Maybe they have patented that structure where the battery slides from bottom and you can keep the down tube as a tube and because of that use reasonable wall thicknesses and so on..

    Like Merida said themselves in one of the articles "..an opening in the down tube for the integrated battery can reduce stiffness by up to 70% " and that is most likely true since that 10k model weight with the carbon frame and carbon wheels is still in the same rough level than almost half the price aluminum models from Canyon, Vitus, Commencal etc.. which use external battery.

    Expensive stuff this integration, but it is the trend at the moment. Just hard to justify twice the price compared to some other models with same motor and suspension components.. And I thought that new 2019 Levo´s were ridiculously expensive – they are starting to look like a bargain to me! :LOL:

    That’s why I ordered Canyon Spectral ON:7 and it just showed up at my door like 15 minutes ago!!!
    I am so excited😁 …hope everything is in the box😛

  23. Can’t agree on the battery capacity being a problem though – this battery is small enough to fit a backpack. 500w is typically enough for the overwhelming majority of rides – then why would you be forced to carry the weight and bulk of a, say, 700w on all of such rides, knowing you’re not going to use it? You only add bulk when you feel you might need it – by carrying your second battery – giving you 1000w instead of the current max in-tube limit of 700.

    Totally agree. I have a Focus Jam2 where a supplementary battery is part of the design/spec, only problem with it is that I find the 378wh batteries supplied a tad too small in power whilst being less than half a kilo less in weight than a 500wh one. Otherwise I find it a very practical solution for range anxiety.

    Still struggling to get my head around the prices of the new Meridas though, but I guess they know that people will pay it.

  24. Can’t agree on the battery capacity being a problem though – this battery is small enough to fit a backpack. 500w is typically enough for the overwhelming majority of rides – then why would you be forced to carry the weight and bulk of a, say, 700w on all of such rides, knowing you’re not going to use it? You only add bulk when you feel you might need it – by carrying your second battery – giving you 1000w instead of the current max in-tube limit of 700.

    I don’t know – everyone is different in how far and hard they ride and for many people a 500wh might only be suitable for 50% of rides wheras the 700 wh battery gives you (going by Levo 500wh:700 wh weight = +750g) an extra 15 to 20 miles on top of the 500 wh for just a 4% weight increase on the bike and would cater for maybe 90% of rides.

    I hate carrying anything on my back let alone a few kilos of lithium-ion so it has to go on the bike IMHO.

  25. I don’t know – everyone is different in how far and hard they ride and for many people a 500wh might only be suitable for 50% of rides wheras the 700 wh battery gives you (going by Levo 500wh:700 wh weight = +750g) an extra 15 to 20 miles on top of the 500 wh for just a 4% weight increase on the bike and would cater for maybe 90% of rides.

    I hate carrying anything on my back let alone a few kilos of lithium-ion so it has to go on the bike IMHO.

    I can see the logic in what Merida have done re the battery though. Getting the battery out quickly is a plus in my book – and being able to carry another battery when needed is a big plus. Re price – for some reason you guys in the UK seem to pay higher prices for Meridas than we do down under. This is probably why there appear to be many more Merida’s in this part of the world than in the UK. It will be interesting to see prices in Australasia compared to say Levo prices.

  26. Yeah, UK Merida pricing seems a bit high. In Norway the old e160-800 is cheaper than the base Levo. The new carbon e160-8000 will be about 2k NOK (€200ish) cheaper than the Levo Comp Carbon.
  27. It will be interesting to see prices in Australasia compared to say Levo prices.

    They are listing at oz $ 8k for the 8 k, 9 k for the 9 k , but 12 k for the 10 k – presumably that extra battery and back pack is costing $2 k ? Weird marketing decision, but I guess it’s generating lots of discussion and might drag merida out f the " budget" perception?

  28. Only problem I see on carbon Ebikes is wondering how they will get old, i mean, my alloy merida wich was bought last december it is in incredible damaged injured by rocks and all around when i descending, the bike is heavy weight so even protected by bikeshield its getting old too fast, so i can imagine if my Ebike was carbon frame how damage will be.. and even more with that prices…
  29. They are listing at oz $ 8k for the 8 k, 9 k for the 9 k , but 12 k for the 10 k – presumably that extra battery and back pack is costing $2 k ? Weird marketing decision, but I guess it’s generating lots of discussion and might drag merida out f the " budget" perception?

    Just over £6500 for a 10k in Oz, its almost worth buying one out there and riding it back to the UK. :)

  30. Less travel, same weight, double cost and same rear triangle meaning no Hope calipers. My wallet was sweating during the teaser video but is now relieved that I’ll be keeping my 900E a little longer.
  31. Is there any info on the 9k model? I can’t seem to find any

    Mentioned this in the live stream…

    I think that Merida made a mistake by heavily featuring the 10K (the £9500 bike) in all of their promo / press stuff… It generated a lot of talk around the price.

    I think they should have featured the other bikes, then the 10K as an option (much like the S-Works is on the Levo)… instead, almost every piece of marketing points to a £9500 Ebike…

  32. Mentioned this in the live stream…

    I think that Merida made a mistake by heavily featuring the 10K (the £9500 bike) in all of their promo / press stuff… It generated a lot of talk around the price.

    I think they should have featured the other bikes, then the 10K as an option (much like the S-Works is on the Levo)… instead, almost every piece of marketing points to a £9500 Ebike…

    Guess they’re publicising the ‘halo’ model for maximum attention, it even got you talking about it on your live stream, which I watched on You Tube this afternoon.

    Intrigued as to what you are going to tell us about the E-Zesty.

  33. Problem is the entry level model has the e7000 motor, so even at that price point its very expensive compared to rivals.
  34. Obviously the new eOne-Sixty looks great, and as an owner of the original, I’m happy that they’ve only needed to tweak the secret recipe to update it. However that’s quite a price to pay for an internal battery!
    It’s hardly lighter than the original, yet has a carbon front triangle?

    Having an internal battery seems like quite a price to pay for aesthetics:
    – Having to spend £1000s on Carbon to offset the weight and structural disadvantages of an integrated battery.
    – Cooling headaches.
    – Pain in the ass to remove the battery (as it’ll be covered in crud).

    I’ve long since wondered why the Kenevo is 2kg heavier than the Merida, given that the only significant weight difference in spec is a coil spring. I think it’s caused by wrapping an internal battery in aluminium, and cutting a battery slot which compromises the structure.

    This leads me to the conclusion that eBikes could be 1kg lighter if we weren’t so vain!

    Also, who the hell needs 12 speed on an eBike, and a range of 10-45 or 10-51? I think I’d manage just fine with 4 ratios on my eBike and save yet another 0.5kg! OK maybe I’m exaggerating a bit, but I copied Sam Pilgrim’s setup upgrading to an 11-36T 10 speed XT cassette. Not only is it a huge weight saving, but I can use a short cage Zee Mech, so the chain isn’t flapping around, plus the 36T ring is plenty to climb even the steepest of hills while towing my mate on his DH bike!

    Shame that many of the changes are driven by fashion rather than common sense.

    By the way, thanks for the video Rob!

    I agree, maybe it’s my legs but I rarely use gears 1-5 even on some of the steepest technical trails, I’m thinking of going from a 34 front down to a 32, I just don’t need the granny gears. If my bike had 10-36 on the back and a 32 or 34 on the front I’d be right in the sweet spot I reckon.

  35. Wonder what the colour schemes will be?

    These are the colors I’ve seen so far.

    black: 10K
    green: 10K
    grey: 5000, 8000, 9000
    purple(?): 8000

    I guess there’ll be more than one color for the 5000 and 9000, but I don’t know what that would be.

  36. The grey and purple look like renders of the colours not actual photos. It will be interesting to see if the old style of e160 is retained as a cheaper model (and exactly how cheap it is).

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